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Over the years I`ve built up a collection of different makes and thread sizes which can be a pain so I`ve have decided to go with one make and fleabay the rest  , what are you chaps using and why?

 

Cheers

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I picked up a few Pro Shot polished stainless rods earlier this week along with their respective jags.

I couldn't be happier with them to be honest, and my existing brushes and patch loops all fit which makes it even better for me

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I decided to do the same as you a few years ago and bought all the bore tech rods proof positive jags etc and everything was bought online from riflecraft

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I've bought a Bore tech rod for my .22 LV bench rest rifle, excellent! Always use their aluminium proof positive jags in all my rifles.

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17 hours ago, bradders said:

I picked up a few Pro Shot polished stainless rods earlier this week along with their respective jags.

I couldn't be happier with them to be honest, and my existing brushes and patch loops all fit which makes it even better for me

Bradders

I'm surprised in using a stainless rod. Wouldn't there be a greater risk or scratching/dinging the bore and crown over a plastic coated rod? I assume you're using a proper bore guide, but isn't a stainless rod just tempting fate?

or is the rod aluminium (so, softer than steel) and not stainless STEEL?

cheers

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Nope, stainless.

If they ran the risk of damaging bores then I don't think they'd sell many :-)

I've always had plastic coated Parker Hale rods, but mine have all seen better days and plastic chips and tears eventually

Yes I use bore guides, but it would have to be a very loose rod in a largish bore to even think about doing any damage.

 

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38 minutes ago, bradders said:

Nope, stainless.

If they ran the risk of damaging bores then I don't think they'd sell many :-)

I've always had plastic coated Parker Hale rods, but mine have all seen better days and plastic chips and tears eventually

Yes I use bore guides, but it would have to be a very loose rod in a largish bore to even think about doing any damage.

 

Hmm, interesting. I take your point about not selling many if the rods did indeed cause damage, though personally I'd still be a bit cautious.

thanks for the reply

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Well think of it like this. 1 correctly sized stainless rod travelling at a modest velocity of 1-2 fps compared to a bullet that's been forced into the rifling travelling at anything up to 3600fps with up to 60000psi of red hot gas up its jacksie. 

Any wear due to a correctly used cleaning rod is negligible i'd say

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37 minutes ago, MJR said:

Well think of it like this. 1 correctly sized stainless rod travelling at a modest velocity of 1-2 fps compared to a bullet that's been forced into the rifling travelling at anything up to 3600fps with up to 60000psi of red hot gas up its jacksie. 

Any wear due to a correctly used cleaning rod is negligible i'd say

That is my view as well.....don't forget to mention spinning at upwards of 240,000 RPM as well :-)

One of the problems with shooting related stuff is people tend to worry too much about most of it!

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11 hours ago, Catch-22 said:

Bradders

I'm surprised in using a stainless rod. Wouldn't there be a greater risk or scratching/dinging the bore and crown over a plastic coated rod? I assume you're using a proper bore guide, but isn't a stainless rod just tempting fate?

or is the rod aluminium (so, softer than steel) and not stainless STEEL?

cheers

The theory is - grit etc could in-bed itself into the plastic coating on rod whereas this can't happen on a stainless steel rod.

Theory or not - with a bore-guide the rod won't touch the bore anyway.

 

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20 minutes ago, JabaliHunter said:

As long as it is sufficiently stiff and isn’t bent... 

That's what she said ?

In all seriousness though, thanks Vince for the insight re plastic rods picking up and scraping dirt - hadn't thought of that before.

I guess I was thinking the steel could possibly do the damage when exiting/entering the crown. Less so scraping down the bore. Personally I'm careful to only let just the end of the patch exit the crown, so I'm not pulling the jag or rod over it. 

And I take the point about fast projectiles and lots of heat/pressure, but as both lead and copper jackets are softer than a steel rod, I'd have thought they'd do less damage anyway. I think we've all heard that more barrels are killed by poor cleaning techniques (e.g. nicking the crown, leaving solvents to attack the bore too long) versus shooting a barrels bore smooth (excludig throat erosion).

Anyway, I've learnt something new about stainless rods.

cheers

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16 minutes ago, Catch-22 said:

I think we've all heard that more barrels are killed by poor cleaning techniques (e.g. nicking the crown, leaving solvents to attack the bore too long) versus shooting a barrels bore smooth (excluding throat erosion).

That old wives tale with no proof...

To get the best out of that one you need to say it in a dour Yorkshire accent, a Barnsley one will suffice for now

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25 minutes ago, bradders said:

That old wives tale with no proof...

To get the best out of that one you need to say it in a dour Yorkshire accent, a Barnsley one will suffice for now

For you Bradders, I'll try my best ?

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I use two types.  One is a Pro-Shot stainless,  the other is a Tipton Carbon fibre one which is a little too flexible for my liking.

The Pro-Shots wont damage your bore.  Most cleaning damage is caused by being a numpty when pushing or pulling jags or brushes past the muzzle resulting in the occasional nick on the crown.  Take care and it won't happen.  I did it once and having the barrel re-crowned taught me not to make that mistake again.  I binned my Parker Hale plastic covered rod after some years use as the plastic degenerated and picked up a lot of crud, probably making it act like an abrasive and probably running more risk of damaging the bore than the Pro-shot.  I rate the Pro-Shots as the best I've used.  Bore guides are a must of course.

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I use the stainless pro shot models. Don't like scabby old nylon covered ones...they attract crap.

Crowns are easily damaged , especially 11 degree ones, by rattling a jag backwards over them. I've seen it several times, its not an old wives tale.

Use a bore guide.

Remove the jag at the muzzle before withdrawing.

Wipe the rod before every insertion.

You won't ever damage a barrel that way.

The crown is the most important part of the rifle.

Its the last thing the bullet touches.

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Baldie, how do you recommend cleaning the crown

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Not something I do personally. The bullet keeps the crown its self clean.

If you want to keep the muzzle face clean, I usually soak it in carbon remover and use an old toothbrush to gently remove the crud.

Scraping with metal implements is going to end in tears.

Regular cleaning, so the face doesn't get caked in carbon is the best route.

KG1 is the best carbon remover i've tried personally.

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Not easy to clean the crown if you've got a brake or flash hider on there, and not worth worrying about

I've taken these off hard used barrels before only to find caked on carbon that resembles pieces of coal, I kid you not.

Sometimes they won't be completely circular but will have a piece missing (like a broken Polo mint) and the guns have still shot perfectly well.

If you want to get it off then a sharp blade to pick it off, followed by a small piece of steel wool, or a little piece of fine emery worked in a circular motion on the end of your thumb will do just nicely.

 

Last year in AZ after our shoot with the NG, we all had to do weapons detail, which isn't easy on a M16.

The Sgt in charge of the Armoury was white gloving everyones rifles and sending them back for further cleaning.

He spotted one rifle with some carbon on the muzzle inside the flash hider and told the Soldier to get in there with a small screwdriver and scrape it off!!  We were all wincing

Our rifles passed muster, except mine was showing a little trace of oil on the disconnector sear, so I had to clean it off with a cotton bud...coz the rifles have to go back in bone dry.

Greenie got sent back 4 times and we were all taking the piss. The Dumbrian says "It's this sh*t cleaning stuff they've given us" and we said "no Dave, we all used the same stuff as you and our rifles are clean, you tw*t. You're just crap at cleaning guns"  :lol:

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1 hour ago, baldie said:

Not something I do personally. The bullet keeps the crown its self clean.

If you want to keep the muzzle face clean, I usually soak it in carbon remover and use an old toothbrush to gently remove the crud.

Scraping with metal implements is going to end in tears.

Regular cleaning, so the face doesn't get caked in carbon is the best route.

KG1 is the best carbon remover i've tried personally.

+1

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thanks for the info on cleaning the crown

 

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I'm not sure about having to remove the jag everytime, that's going to be a novelty that wears thin quickly, just don't drag it back through at a rate of knots. I just remove the patch and then slowly push the jag back into the bore by holding the end and guiding it in, once it's cleared the crown pull the rod out as normal, wipe and repeat.

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