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What is so much better about a £200 Atlas Bipod ???


Jamie

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Firstly, before the few trolls out there get excited......

This is a genuine question. I have never owned what I suppose you would call a "quality" bipod.

I forget the name of my bipods, but they are average looking 9" (max) or so tilt types. And have been "ok" as far as my knowledge goes anyhow....

But having just seen a bipod with lots of letters and numbers after it go for £200, I'm wondering what I'm missing??

So please could some of the vastly more knowledgeable members out there shed some light on the benefits of having such an expensive bipod, and what they bring to the table that a £50 tilt bipod could not?

Also, do the target shooters amongst you, (Say 100-800 yards) use bipods or bags?

Thanks

Jamie

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Jamie-you have the end of the stick all wrong some of the ftr lads will bestowe there knowledge on you- re the atlas and other pods that can cost a lot more.

prepare to be amazed-educated and made to feel a little more enlightened

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The Atlas is designed ground up as a well engineered tactical bipod for use with precision rifles for the military, law enforcement and tactical shooter. It utilises a well thought out and unique design that allows the user flexibility in all sorts of terrain and conditions. Its made from high quality materials and engineered to work right and last. Right there is what your £200 is getting you - it is miles apart from a cheap Chinese Harris knock-off.

 

In practical terms for the non mil / LE shooter it is an excellent choice for a precision rifle being used out in the field. If you are a dedicated F-class shooter then there might be better options. The Atlas has a degree of 'slop' that's built in, allowing rifles to be loaded (more so than the Harris) and a good amount of tilt and cant to allow tracking and flexibility from the firing position. They don't lock up like a Harris with a pod lock but this is deliberate.

 

I have two and both are used for field and target shooting and all my shooting gets done off bi-pods and back bags in the prone position. One's on my AI AX, the other goes on the various AICS Chassis including .300WM and .338 which gets stretched out regularly beyond 1000 yards. I do also use them for club competition, excellent for McQueens and for me works fine for F-Class / FTR (at club level!).

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The atlas wont flick closed under a heavy rifle when youre dragging it around on grass/rock etc trying to get on target for the first, second, third, fourth......shots.

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Well I've never owned an Atlas but I have tried them. For me there is very little if any benefit over a genuine harris. I actually find them fiddly to operate but they are a well made quality item. I'd suggest trying to find one to try before buying.

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Well I've never owned an Atlas but I have tried them. For me there is very little if any benefit over a genuine harris. I actually find them fiddly to operate but they are a well made quality item. I'd suggest trying to find one to try before buying.

+1

Fiddly but well made.

I used one on a rifle borrowed for a csr comp and found I had to really push hard against it to get any consistency. Kind of spoiled the comp for me and left me wishing I had used a podlocked Harris!

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Cheers for the insight fella's, I gathered they would be top quality. Didn't know you could "track" your target though...

atb

Jamie

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I had to really push hard against it to get any consistency.

 

That's probably why you struggled to get consistency. They should not be shouldered hard or muscled into position. A solid shooting position square behind the rifle with gentle but firm forward pressure to load the bi-pod forward is required. This keeps the recoil pulse in line and allows you to stay on target and follow the shot. The Atlas is much better at this than a Harris.

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That's probably why you struggled to get consistency. They should not be shouldered hard or muscled into position. A solid shooting position square behind the rifle with gentle but firm forward pressure to load the bi-pod forward is required. This keeps the recoil pulse in line and allows you to stay on target and follow the shot. The Atlas is much better at this than a Harris.

It doesn't matter how you use a bipod, what is important is that you use them the same every time.

This is why I'm not a fan of the damned things, they make you too sloppy

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It doesn't matter how you use a bipod, what is important is that you use them the same every time.

This is why I'm not a fan of the damned things, they make you too sloppy

 

Bradders - it makes a massive difference how you use a bipod. You can use it consistently and still not shoot well - for example how many people will shoot a Harris on a hard surface and have it jump on recoil. Like everything shooting is all about consistency that I agree but bi-pods are tools that require a method in their use in order to get the best out of them.

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That's probably why you struggled to get consistency. They should not be shouldered hard or muscled into position. A solid shooting position square behind the rifle with gentle but firm forward pressure to load the bi-pod forward is required. This keeps the recoil pulse in line and allows you to stay on target and follow the shot. The Atlas is much better at this than a Harris.

Your point about alignment applies to any bipod. The fact that the atlas has panning movement will tempt the shooter to shoot from a misaligned position when engaging a wide arc of targets and in my view is another mark against it.

The point that I was trying to make was that the atlas is very different to the Harris and in an "under duress" situation is far less intuitive to use.

I prefer a looser hold so have no plans to buy an atlas.

Suggest the OP tries before he buys.

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Your point about alignment applies to any bipod. The fact that the atlas has panning movement will tempt the shooter to shoot from a misaligned position when engaging a wide arc of targets and in my view is another mark against it.

The point that I was trying to make was that the atlas is very different to the Harris and in an "under duress" situation is far less intuitive to use.

I prefer a looser hold so have no plans to buy an atlas.

Suggest the OP tries before he buys.

 

I guess the point is pick your system and learn how to use it properly - the issues you raise boil down to using a new piece of kit for the first time in a competitive and pressured environment without familiarisation and practice. However I accept that your personal preference is the Harris - a perfectly good system too.

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Bradders - it makes a massive difference how you use a bipod. You can use it consistently and still not shoot well - for example how many people will shoot a Harris on a hard surface and have it jump on recoil. Like everything shooting is all about consistency that I agree but bi-pods are tools that require a method in their use in order to get the best out of them.

Wrong answer there fella.

 

Oaken mentions the misalignment issue, which is very valid.

People have a tendency to just plop themselves on the ground any old way when shooting with a bipod and expect to get away with it, with little consideration to position, tension or anything else.

I think the bloody things just make you last and a poorer shot.

 

But you'll all disagree with me here.

I'm not saying they're bad, but as a shooter they encourage laziness and sloppiness

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Bradders - it makes a massive difference how you use a bipod. You can use it consistently and still not shoot well - for example how many people will shoot a Harris on a hard surface and have it jump on recoil. Like everything shooting is all about consistency that I agree but bi-pods are tools that require a method in their use in order to get the best out of them.

Wrong answer there fella. ;)

 

Oaken mentions the misalignment issue, which is very valid.

People have a tendency to just plop themselves on the ground any old way when shooting with a bipod and expect to get away with it, with little consideration to position, tension or anything else.

I think the bloody things just make you last and a poorer shot.

 

But you'll all disagree with me here.

I'm not saying they're bad, but as a shooter they encourage laziness and sloppiness

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Wrong answer there fella. ;)

 

Oaken mentions the misalignment issue, which is very valid.

People have a tendency to just plop themselves on the ground any old way when shooting with a bipod and expect to get away with it, with little consideration to position, tension or anything else.

I think the bloody things just make you last and a poorer shot.

 

But you'll all disagree with me here.

I'm not saying they're bad, but as a shooter they encourage laziness and sloppiness

 

Wrong or just of a different opinion?

 

Oaken mentions misalignment - this is a valid point but its not the bipods fault, its designed that way. Its up to shooter to set up right. If its a feature you don't like or won't use then fine, don't buy the thing.

 

You'll not find me arguing on shooting position. Shooting with a bipod requires technique and correct body position no matter which one you use - I practice this aspect a lot and subscribe to the straight back behind the rifle, legs in a V. I shoot a lot of long range on my own which requires watching trace and bullet impact. Natural point of aim, good body position and recoil management all come into it.

 

Shooting with a bipod is just another technique - its up to the shooter how they implement it.

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ok so youve talked about the harris and the atlas bipods, what about the versa pod?

ive tryed the harris did not suit my way of shooting tryed the versa pod and once id figured it out, loved it, id like to use the atlas but, dont think i could part with nearly £300 when you include the leg extentions as i like the legs to be higher, and plus putting a rail on so i have the use of the quick release and still be able to use my sling stud which. the versa pod allowed.

 

tony

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The thing that puts me off the Atlas is the need for a rail which I don't have

You can easily buy adaptors, £20 or so IIRC, just a short piece of picatinny rail, mine has a swivel stud on the front if needed also.

 

The rail attaches to the existing swivel stud on your stock. Tightens up solid with no movement.

 

I have one on all my rifles and use the one Atlas with the American Defense quick release for all of them.

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I guess the point is pick your system and learn how to use it properly - the issues you raise boil down to using a new piece of kit for the first time in a competitive and pressured environment without familiarisation and practice. However I accept that your personal preference is the Harris - a perfectly good system too.

I agree with both points :-)
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