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Shooting using sticks


maxtich

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Hi, may I kindly ask for advice on shooting using sticks. Having problems trying to control left to right movement when using sticks, especially when shooting 100 yards +range. Any advice on how to shoot steady using sticks will be much appreciated

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Hi, may I kindly ask for advice on shooting using sticks. Having problems trying to control left to right movement when using sticks, especially when shooting 100 yards +range. Any advice on how to shoot steady using sticks will be much appreciated

how many legs do your sticks have 2 or 3 as the later may be more stable, if using a 3 legged version stoney point do a tag alone which helps suport the but, i find them easier to use from a sitting position or leaning my body up against something for support if theres something avaible. practice always helps too.

 

atb Matt

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Hi, may I kindly ask for advice on shooting using sticks. Having problems trying to control left to right movement when using sticks, especially when shooting 100 yards +range. Any advice on how to shoot steady using sticks will be much appreciated


Use 4 sticks as per the photo attached. My summertime success rate went up dramatically when I changed to these. If I spot movement, I just stop and get the rifle on the 4 sticks. I also use them as a single stick for close range and as a double stick if I am not sure exactly where the quarry is. One hand is free for spying or squeaking.

 

test%201.jpgRegards JCS

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Use 4 sticks as per the photo attached. My summertime success rate went up dramatically when I changed to these. If I spot movement, I just stop and get the rifle on the 4 sticks. I also use them as a single stick for close range and as a double stick if I am not sure exactly where the quarry is. One hand is free for spying or squeaking. Regards JCS

 

I went to the solution described by JCS too; not far off being as good as prone.

 

Takes a few minutes practice to get the set up smooth; but once you've got the habit they're easy to use, and whilst a tad slower than a conventional 2 stick arrangement, you then hit what you're aiming at! :)

 

 

...another alternative I tried was having a length of cord from the 'hinge' on the 2 stick set-up and standing on the hanging end to produce a 3rd leg to tension against.

 

 

...but if you really want to steady yourself, JCS's solution is the way to go.

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I found I had to use a tripod to be sure of stability. I did try the quad sticks but found them a real nuisance in woodland when the deer were moving, (or when foxing when you are waiting for a moving target to stop and give you a shot) I couldnt realign them fast enough and they have no lateral movement.

 

With the tripod I make sure the third leg is forward so it resists and then as OG says lean into them. Also I stand with my feet apart sideways rather than forward and back as usual. Makes a tripod out of you. Final advice would be to go out with the .22 and shoot a cartload of rabbits off sticks if you get the chance (if thats not what you are doing) as practice is the biggy.

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Don't fight your natural r-l or l-r motion, learn to release your shot as the crosshairs cover your desired poi.Better a controlled and smooth motion than trying to get a rock steady sight picture when you just induce random movement of the crosshairs up,down, left right etc. Works for me and I've shot multiple deer at all ranges using it, before you buy more gear just try it, a .22 is a good place to start as someone already said.

 

Mike

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Also I stand with my feet apart sideways rather than forward and back as usual.

 

I found the same as Abolter, when I was practising my DSC level 1, I found the only movement was up and down. And for me was much easier with less movement to release the shot at the required moment.

 

Been tempted to try JCS system, but yet to find a decent set.

 

Steve

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I shoot off sticks quite often while foxing, the best thing I find to do is get plenty of practice in with or with out live ammunition (dry firing off the sticks). Don't have the mag on your scope set too high, and as the cross hairs move into the kill zone gently squeeze off the shot, don't try to hold dead still and on target for too long as you'll just fight it and move even more. Those quad sticks look the business mind.

Simon

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  • 3 months later...
Don't fight your natural r-l or l-r motion, learn to release your shot as the crosshairs cover your desired poi.Better a controlled and smooth motion than trying to get a rock steady sight picture when you just induce random movement of the crosshairs up,down, left right etc. Works for me and I've shot multiple deer at all ranges using it, before you buy more gear just try it, a .22 is a good place to start as someone already said.

 

Mike

+ 1

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For sticks 2 or none for me. Its the only set up i've found quick and easy echo whats above by DanP and OG with the addition to the lean in i find easier and more stable if the stick bottoms are a few inches away from you so the top points slight back at you. This allows you to better brace against them and provides the stability rather than just a weight rest for the fore-end. You can do it one handed and with very little practice it can be done as quick as it takes to mount the rifle. Two green garden poles with a horizontal lash with 3 frapping turns using a bungy with the metal ends taken off works really well and is cheap.

 

Not to everyones tastes due to the aesthetic but I find a z-aim very useful and far superior to a bipod for a stalking rifle, after a little practice prone, sitting kneeling and standing shots can be greatly improved. Worth a look anyhow; i've had mine for about 7-8 years i think and it even getting fitted to my custom.

 

best of luck

Will

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Four sticks is great for keeping steedy I made a set out of garden sticks for £20. Only trouble is the time it takes to set them up, could of shot 2 munties this week if I was quicker but its swings and roundabouts really.

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  • 1 month later...

I found the same as Abolter, when I was practising my DSC level 1, I found the only movement was up and down. And for me was much easier with less movement to release the shot at the required moment.

 

Been tempted to try JCS system, but yet to find a decent set.

 

Steve

Make them. Lol. 4 lengths of dowel some lamb tail bands and if you wish like I do some strap for resting rifle on. If you wish to have more info PM me.

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  • 8 months later...

Buy a good set of sticks, Something like knob loks. Cheap sticks flex and bow. I wedge my rifle in the top v on top of the sling, And as paddy said lean into the sticks. Most importantly practice

RGDS SEAN

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Sticks are an excellent way of getting to your target over high grass , wall or foliage, practice, practice, practice….

 

 

Shot at a local annual stalkers competition at Grizedale this year..

 

Nine shots, all standing - 100, 70 and 40 mtrs

 

Black target, black insert, no discernible scoring area….

 

 

 

photo-18_zps5f8b1be0.jpg

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Four sticks is great for keeping steedy I made a set out of garden sticks for £20. Only trouble is the time it takes to set them up, could of shot 2 munties this week if I was quicker but its swings and roundabouts really.

When you are in a hurry there are two more options. Use the 4 sticks as a single stick for short ranges and a very quick response. Secondly just deploy as a twin stick under the fore end. I got a CWD buck using them in twin stick mode at 23 yds in Feb this year. The twin stick approach also works if you're not sure where a fox or deer might appear next.

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/12296998/4%20sticks/test%204.jpg

 

Regards

JCS

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Good post form me to view, I recently made a decision to shoot foxes of sticks, it seems that every time I go out I loose a fox because when I get down on the bipod I cant see the target, you know the story guys. So I invested in a set of three legged vanguards, I have taped and foamed them up so they are nice and quiet and easy to use. I took them out with the .223 and a NV add on attached to the scope also a stock extender fitted. I managed to shot some really good rabbits confidently out to 160 yards plus. So much so I impressed myself. HOWEVER I missed the last two foxes of the sticks, some thing happens to me mentally when Charlie appears. I was just considering going back to the bipod, but should I drop the third leg and try just two. I have no idea iam confused, and fed up with missing the last two.

Help !!!!

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Good post form me to view, I recently made a decision to shoot foxes of sticks, it seems that every time I go out I loose a fox because when I get down on the bipod I cant see the target, you know the story guys. So I invested in a set of three legged vanguards, I have taped and foamed them up so they are nice and quiet and easy to use. I took them out with the .223 and a NV add on attached to the scope also a stock extender fitted. I managed to shot some really good rabbits confidently out to 160 yards plus. So much so I impressed myself. HOWEVER I missed the last two foxes of the sticks, some thing happens to me mentally when Charlie appears. I was just considering going back to the bipod, but should I drop the third leg and try just two. I have no idea iam confused, and fed up with missing the last two.

Help !!!!

 

 

Post Traumatic Stick Disorder!

You have shown that you can shoot rabbits very well with the tripod,surely a more technically difficult target.

Best therapy would be more practice with them,though there used to be bipods with optional extending legs good enough for sitting shots.

Gbal

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Post Traumatic Stick Disorder!

You have shown that you can shoot rabbits very well with the tripod,surely a more technically difficult target.

Best therapy would be more practice with them,though there used to be bipods with optional extending legs good enough for sitting shots.

Gbal

Spot on post traumatic stick disorder ! but I will persevere !

cheers

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