Jump to content
UKV - The Place for Precision Rifle Enthusiasts
Sign in to follow this  
MJR

Amateur Tikka 595 pillar bedding

Recommended Posts

I decided to have a try at pillar bedding a T595 I have in .243. The rifle shot ok and I had previously skim bedded the action but I wanted to see if it could be improved still further. I should point out that before trying this i'd read up on the subject and spoken to a rfd friend who does build some very fine and consistently accurate rifles. I won't name that person but thanks for the time taken and advice given, its much appreciated. Also, this post is not meant to be a 'how to' guide, i'm not an expert, just an insight as to how I approached the job.

First the old bedding needed to be removed and pockets machined in the stock for the front and rear pillars. I milled the material out of the stock and machined deep enough for a 3mm thick bed under the action and deeper around the pillars.
post-9241-0-72578300-1501701084_thumb.jpg

post-9241-0-15608100-1501701156_thumb.jpg


Next I machined up two pillars. The rear one is a simple tube with grooves machined on the outside to provide some mechanical grip for the bedding compound. Anyone familiar with the 595 action will know they don't have a remington style recoil lug but do have a cylindrical boss on the bottom of the action where the front action screw attaches. I machined the front pillar to accomadate this boss internally and provide a form of recoil lug for the stock.

post-9241-0-81217700-1501701199_thumb.jpg

post-9241-0-74314400-1501701233_thumb.jpg


Next it was time to prepare the action for bedding. I plugged all the holes in the action with plasticine and gave the whole lot two very thorough coats of Kiwi polish, buffed between coats and making sure everything was covered!

 

post-9241-0-62196100-1501701272_thumb.jpg

 

I masked up the stock with masking tape and wound electrical tape around the barrel where it exits the stock fore end to ensure correct fit of the barrelled action in the stock. With the action sitting in the stock the only points that made contact were the rear most part of the rear tang and the electrical tape on the barrel. I put more tape around the barrel to act as a dam for the beeding material but this was not weight bearing. With everything ready, paper roll and cotton buds to hand for the clean up I mixed up the Devcon. Mixing it is easy, just follow the instructions on the box but be warned, it sticks to absolutely everything.

post-9241-0-35992600-1501701323_thumb.jpg
I applied the Devcon to the action and inside the stock making sure to poke some down the holes for the pillars.

 

post-9241-0-81387500-1501701352_thumb.jpg


With everything coated in Devcon I mated the two parts together and began the tedious process of removing all the excess bedding that oozes out of everywhere. I'd been advised to take my time and make sure everywhere was cleaned up including up inside the magazine well. i did and eventually secured everything in place with a couple of wraps of electrical tape around the action and stock.

 

post-9241-0-09398000-1501701392_thumb.jpg


With nothing left to do, I tidied up and left the rifle overnight to cure and fully harden. The following day I removed the electrical tape and gently tapped the underside of the barrel with the palm of my hand. It was around this point I was convinced i'd glued the action into the stock and now had the 595 equivalent of an AW bonded in action! I tried several times and it wouldn't budge. In annoyance/desperation I gave it a proper thack and there was a cracking sound. I'd either broken the stock or the action was free. Thankfully it was the later and the action had moved very slightly. 5 minutes of gentle rocking later and the action came free of the stock.

post-9241-0-86458800-1501701424_thumb.jpg

I returned to the milling machine and machined the excess bedding out of the stock and relieved the trigger well and clearance for the safety catch. Bedding material had also oozed under the tape infront of the action so I removed that to and cleaned it up to a crisp edge. I removed all the plasticine from the action and cleaned it up and finally it was ready for reassembly.

post-9241-0-75817000-1501701515_thumb.jpg

Take a close look at the pictures and you will see the bedding is not perfect. There are a couple of small air bubbles in the bedding around the rear lug and a couple not visible on the vertical sides of the stock but overall i'm happy with the results. The bedding provides good surface contact with the stock and most of all a ggod recoil attachment.

Has it improved the Rifle? Accuracy wise I don't yet know, I havent had chance to shoot it yet. One thing that has definately improved is the feel of the gun, it feels far more solid and together.

So thats it, my attempt at pillar bedding. Like I said, not a 'how to' guide just how I did it. If anyone else is considering a similar project I hope this gives you some encouragement to have a go - but don't blame me if you glue the action in!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nothing wrong with that mate and just saved £150 well done you can do my remmy next week :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like you've done a damned good job there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I know that stock ;) well done, tidy job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice job Mike but you've chopped out the groove for the bolt on the wrong side of the stock ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firman, you should recognise it.

Tim, all the real rifles have the bolt on the left......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done Mike.

 

Perseverance and preparation paid dividends (and saved you £250 at least)

 

Slight learning curve with the sides of the action but thats cosmetic only and unseen when the action is in the stock anyway - don't beat yourself up over that.

 

 

I'll bet you it shoots better now too…. :D

 

 

Time to take it to the range and shoot some groups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you make the pillars with an angle on the bottom end?

I get from measuring my Tikka m558 and doing some trigonometry that the floor plate sits at an angle of about 3 degrees. This means that in order to get a stress free installation the pillars need to be machined at that angle. Or will the plastic floor plate conform to the pillars and take the stress? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could do that or bed the floor plate in also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's my intention, but I see a risk of getting issues with cartridge feeding if the angle is wrong.

Easy enough to test though before bedding the pillars into the stock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy