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A question for those reloaders who also anneal their brass


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Thanks for the replies.

I've recently built an induction annealer and have also found a cheap portable hardness tester that allows me to measure the hardness of the brass at the neck of the case before and after annealing to ensure that the hardness has dropped to near the same as it is for new (annealed) brass.

in a couple of days there will be a YouTube video showing the annealer and hardness tester .

I'll post a link when it goes live

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

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8 hours ago, phoenix said:

Thanks for the replies.

I've recently built an induction annealer and have also found a cheap portable hardness tester that allows me to measure the hardness of the brass at the neck of the case before and after annealing to ensure that the hardness has dropped to near the same as it is for new (annealed) brass.

in a couple of days there will be a YouTube video showing the annealer and hardness tester .

I'll post a link when it goes live

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

I will look forward to watching it.

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Interesting video but I completely disagree disregarding molten salt annealing,  the paper mentioned is partisan, the purpose of which is selling a product not comparing methods fairly.  Molten salt processes are common in industry especially for heating complex shapes like cutting tools where thin and thick sections must heat uniformly.

I would readily agree that the temperature of the heat-source matters in ensuring local heat rise before too much heat runs down the case however,  heat/time profile achieved using gas, induction or conduction(molten salt) is the same - what varies is the process stability.  This is where gas flame systems can be troublesome to calibrate.

I use molten salt, it works just fine,  real world testing confirms this to my satisfaction.  Clear improvement in neck tension consistency, never seen a crack or split,  brass lasts until the primer pockets are too slack (about 15 reloads of .308 LRP Lapua).  Isn't that the objective?

I'm very happy to have spent £10s not £100s,  more shooting practice and less gadget acquiring.

I'd be interested in Badger's take on this - he's one that's actually qualified in this metal manipulation.

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