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booboobear

cut and crown

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Hi, iam just in the process of negotiating a deal for a remington 700 which has a barrel lenght of  25" just wondering how much it would cost to take 5" off Thread and recrown.

Regards Neil

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I think the OP was intending to both shorten and have it re threaded and crowned. Generally that’s what happens when chopping a barrel - it happens from the muzzle end. Unless of course you want to rechamber, in which case the barrel gets chopped from the breech end (contour of the Knox permitting) and rechambered in a different calibre (for example). 

booboobear - if you’re not changing calibre or the breech end, so only lopping some off the end and threading and crowing, the barrel will also need a re-Proof.

Somewhere between £150-£250 shortening, threading and crowning, another £100 proof. 

Dunno where you are based, so unless there’s a decent gunsmith near you, factor another £25 each way for RFD handling fees to get it to your chosen smith and back again. 

Though for only a few hundred quid more, you can get a custom barrel made up (thinking one of the excellent Begera barrels, or a Lother Walther barrel). They cost around £200 -£250 for a blank and a good Smith is likely to charge around £600 for a full barrel job (the barrel, chambering, threading, crowing & proofing). Painting will be extra though. Reason why I suggest this as an option is Rem factory barrels are not really the best and you're paying about 60% of the cost of a custom barrel purely to keep the old factory barrel...with who knows how many rounds down it or how well it’s been maintained. Just don’t throw good money after bad. Worth considering.

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surely no one would do it without re proof as this protects the gunsmith  ?

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7 hours ago, Moorlander said:

If its re threaded it does need re proofing , ask the proof house directly if you doubt it.

That could be argued about for ages, but i wont bite..

best ask a professional rifle builder what they do and what their insurance allows them to do to find out what happens in the real world based on relevant good practice.

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Have Jackson Rifles not already disproved the need for re-proofing on end of barrel work such as shortening  -screw cutting - re-crowning.

I know in our area a very well experienced gun-smith stopped sending such work to the proof-house.

 

 

 

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That was my understanding also.

I recently has a CZ527 in 22 hornet shortened and threaded, by a smith who builds and shoots F class rifles and the subject of reproof was never even discussed.

On a modern rifle which was proofed when new, can anyone describe a set of circumstances under which chopping the barrel by a couple of inches and rethreading it for a moderator can weaken the barrel to the point of failure?

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

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3 hours ago, eddieb said:

Have Jackson Rifles not already disproved the need for re-proofing on end of barrel work such as shortening  -screw cutting - re-crowning.

I know in our area a very well experienced gun-smith stopped sending such work to the proof-house.

 

 

 

No , they did get an ambiguous report on moderators however.

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2 hours ago, phoenix said:

 

On a modern rifle which was proofed when new, can anyone describe a set of circumstances under which chopping the barrel by a couple of inches and rethreading it for a moderator can weaken the barrel to the point of failure?

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

If a bad or inexperienced gunsmith went too deep on undercut  it would definitely weaken the end of the barrel , add a big heavy moderator and you could be in for some fireworks.

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A bit more detail on exactly how those "fireworks" would manifest themselves please

Cheers

 

Bruce

 

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1 hour ago, Moorlander said:

If a bad or inexperienced gunsmith went too deep on undercut  it would definitely weaken the end of the barrel , add a big heavy moderator and you could be in for some fireworks.

And that wouldn't be checked or found out by the proof house.....

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3 minutes ago, lapua said:

And that wouldn't be checked or found out by the proof house.....

It would cover whoever had done the work better than someone who hadn't bothered to get it proofed .

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27 minutes ago, phoenix said:

A bit more detail on exactly how those "fireworks" would manifest themselves please

Cheers

 

Bruce

 

If the undercut was too deep the moderator could blow off the end taking the thread with it , bits of shrapnel could fly around , I wouldnt want to be standing next to it.

You could argue that modern rifles dont need proofing at as they have a proven design but then not every rifle passes proof.

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Sorry, but I'm not convinced by that.

Are there any confirmed instances of the scenario you describe actually happening?

 

  

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16 minutes ago, phoenix said:

Sorry, but I'm not convinced by that.

Are there any confirmed instances of the scenario you describe actually happening?

 

  

I agree its unlikely but I`d say not impossible  , if it did I`d imagine the riflesmiths insurer would be a bit hesitant if it hadn't been proofed, personally I like to dot the I`s and cross the T`s and would pay my RFD for proofing.

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I'm a Nondestructive Testing Engineer by trade and have spent over 40 years looking at and measuring pressure bearing steel tubes with threads on their ends and I'm totally confident that the scenario you describe is about as likely as me winning the lottery every week for a year

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

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My last rifle to go through the London proof house has the proof marks at the muzzle end of the barrel.  Any shortening of my barrel would be removing the existing proof marks!  Sneaky....

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3 hours ago, Dunc said:

My last rifle to go through the London proof house has the proof marks at the muzzle end of the barrel.  Any shortening of my barrel would be removing the existing proof marks!  Sneaky....

Indeed , if you look at import rifle that has to go to proof and is threaded the sneaky gits stamp it just below the thread .

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17 hours ago, phoenix said:

 

I'm a Nondestructive Testing Engineer by trade and have spent over 40 years looking at and measuring pressure bearing steel tubes with threads on their ends and I'm totally confident that the scenario you describe is about as likely as me winning the lottery every week for a year

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

However the proof house disagree .

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1 hour ago, Moorlander said:

Indeed , if you look at import rifle that has to go to proof and is threaded the sneaky gits stamp it just below the thread .

Yep, that's what they did to two of my rifle's in Birmingham proof house recently, and chamber end too.

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13 hours ago, Moorlander said:

Indeed , if you look at import rifle that has to go to proof and is threaded the sneaky gits stamp it just below the thread .

Cant blame them can you  after all they have stamped it safe they dont want some 'cowboy' machining it afterwards ..

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