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Sako differences

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Can some of you more informed gents enlighten me as to the differences between sako A2 + 75 models.

 

What are the pros and cons?

 

Is the 85 a better option of the 3 ?

 

Thanks

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Guest varmartin

Have a look on the Sako web sight under ` old models`...cant see a listing for `A2` as i suspect it is the same as there L579 Forester and 491/591 .

 

This is the short answer......

 

From what i can see the A2 type is based on a `two lug` mauser action and as you know the 75 is a 3 lug type.

 

Hope this helps..

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Hi

 

If you have a look at the Sako Collectors Club on MSN, all your questions will be answered. A lot of owners cherish the older L579 and A series Models. The later 491's and 591's are not so popular. I can't remember the reason but it was either due to poorer quality control or a change in the manufacturing process. The 75 series is almost a redesign completely compared to the older models.

 

I've owned L579's, A11's and currently have a 75 Series. I couldn't fault any of them but to my eyes the L579 was a rifle of quality and beauty, wish I hadn't sold it! :(

 

Mack

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I am with Mack, the L579 was definitely the better quality item, excellent trigger too. The 75 varmint was pretty good ( different than the sporters), but if your after a rifle to customise the 579 is the one to go for, I wouldnt sell mine thats for sure.

redfox

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Guest northernchris

Redfox bang on the button mate.

The older models like the A2 etc are machined from billet/solid opposed to the 75 which is a casting.Ask Tikka on here about the about the brand new 591 sporter i found him which we rebarreled into .260 ,it knocks his other to rifles (tricked up remmys) into a cocked hat :(

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Thanks guys I will have a look at your suggestion Mack.

Like has been said I had a look on the sako site under old models but couldn't find the A2 and wondered if it had another name. A few of the A2's seem to be cropping up a lately.

Had my mind set on a sako 75 243 stainless synthetic but with these other options occurring I might have a look at some of the others.

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Looking again on the sako website I noticed this link,

 

http://www.sako.fi/pdf/datatables/SakoOldmodelsNumbering.pdf

 

 

Again it does not mention A2's can anybody explain why? am I missing something really obvious or was A2 an alternative to another sako used name (L579 or L 61).

I see it mentions A1's and A3's with them changing the stamping designation.

 

Just interested to know in case I opt for one of these.

Cheers

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The A series rifles were introduced in about 1980, with the A1 replacing the L461 action, the A2 replacing the L579, etc.

Apart from minor differences in stock design on some models and the introduction of a 2 stage match trigger on some of the Varmint rifles, the only difference was a new shroud on the rear of the bolt, which may be why there are few references to the A series rifles.

A few A2s had a plastic magazine follower, but the A series rifles are generally all steel, with an integral recoil lug, unlike the 75's which have a seperate lug which is held in position by a screw. I have heard of a couple of 75's with accuracy problems caused by a loose recoil lug, but have no first hand experience of any such trouble.

I have a couple of A1s, an A2 and an L61 as well as a 3 75s. I really don't foresee a time when old Sakos will not be in my collection!

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The first civilian rifle bearing the Sako name was the L42 (Luodikko [rifle] model 1942) chambered for the 7x33mm Sako cartridge, prototyped in 1942, and commercial production started after WWII. Sako developed the 7x33 cartridge based on the 9x19 pistol cartridge, by making a longer case and "necking" the case down to 7mm calibre (7.21mm bullet diameter). This cartridge was designed for and well suited to capercaille and black grouse hunting, a popular sport in Finland, Sweden and Norway. The L46 was later denoted L461 "Vixen". The L461 has been very popular in Finland and Sweden, especially chambered for the .222 Remington cartridge and has an almost mythical status among aficionados.

 

In 1957, Sako launched a longer action, the L57, subsequently renamed L579 "Forester". This is a "medium action" intended for the .308 Winchester and similar cartridges.

 

In 1961, Sako introduced the L61R "Finnbear" for the long cartridges like the .30-06, 6.5x55 and similar.

 

For a short while, Sako produced a lever-action gun, the Sako Finnwolf, in .243 Win and .308 Win

 

Sako has also produced a number of rimfire rifles, among those are the P72 Finnscout, the M78 and the Finnfire. The M78 was also chambered for the .22 Hornet and the .22 WMR in addition to the .22 LR

 

During the 1980s, Sako started using the AI/AII/AV designations (previously used for models imported to the US) for the three action lengths in Europe. The complete rifles were still designated L461/L579/L61. The bolt was given a slight cosmetic makeover, with the hammer covered by a conical shell., This visual design was also used on the later models (M4/5/691, M75, M85).

 

A modified, larger diameter, version of the short (Vixen) action was produced for the .22 PPC and 6mm PPC cartridges, when Sako introduced these former wildcat cartridges as commercial cartridges, denoted ".22 PPC USA" and "6mm PPC USA" to avoid confusion with the specialized bench rest cartridges which required a "tight neck" chamber.

 

In 1992, the first of the "newer" Sakos, the 591, was introduced as a replacement for the L579. Shortly after, the 491 and the 691 were launched. These rifles (491/591/691) are not as highly regarded as the L461/L579/L61R and according to folklore, the quality of the workmanship is slightly inferior for the 491/591/691. They featured a separate recoil lug, also found on the 75, and a Tikka trigger assembly. However, these rifles were available in left-hand configuration both as a medium action (591) and long action (691)

 

In 1997, Sako launched the M75, named for Sako's 75th anniversary. The 75 was externally similar to previous Sako models, but the construction was radically different featuring three symmetrical locking lugs and a detachable magazine. Before the 75, Sako hunting rifles (except the L46) did not have detachable magazines, but a hinged floorplate with the lock placed on the front of the trigger guard.

 

Sako's latest (and current) model, the M85, was introduced in 2006.

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Good post Mack.

 

Put a Howa and a L579 Sako side by side with the stocks removed and you will see who Howa copied when designing their action. :)

 

Best rgds

 

B-b

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Good post Mack.

 

Put a Howa and a L579 Sako side by side with the stocks removed and you will see who Howa copied when designing their action. :)

 

Best rgds

 

B-b

 

Very similar Kev,

I've got the two. Pity the action screw distance is not the same.

I'd like to fit my howa stock to the L579

 

The Howa action and bolt actually seems a bit sturdier.

 

edi

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WOW cheers guys especially Macks post :)

 

I think that answers all my questions, just goes to show how knowledgeable a forum we have here.

 

Thanks.

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WOW cheers guys especially Macks post :)

 

 

Big second to that.

I'd always meant to study up this stuff but never got round to it. You've saved me the trouble Mack.

 

As a kid, I always admired Sakos. A guy in our club had a heap and they were all tackdrivers, esp the .222 Vixens. He had a matching pair of Super Deluxe in .222 and 22-250- enough to make any shooter drool.

 

Chris-NZ

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My father bought a L579 in 308 between 69 and 71 in South Africa. This Sako was known

to only shoot when hot..?? It had shot over 1000 kudu with a PH and with a bit of mistreatment

it might have been shot out. Anyway the damn thing wouldn't hit a sheet of paper with a clean

barrel, even missed the plank I had the paper on. After 15 rounds she would group 30mm.

If I think back of how many wounded animals that rifle accounted for in all those years, on a

few occasions I was along.

 

Had her rebarreled, since then she is perfect.

 

edi

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Guest Baldrick

In my search for true left-hand Sakos I have only found 75, A4 and 691 made in L/H. I stupidly sold my Sako 75 Hunter 6.5x55. I would give a kidney to track another L/H 75 down in any other calibre. I'm mulling over whether to buy two 691s at present.

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