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stephentri

Inside of brass neck to clean

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Hi 

I have noticed that when I clean brass with the ultrasonic cleaner the inside of the necks almost appear rough, do any of you polish the inside after cleaning, is there any benefit in doing.

Thanks 

Stephen 

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Short and sweet:  No and no

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I use a 35 or 40 cal bisley bronze brush in cordless screwdriver to remove the carbon but I don't ultrasonic yet...

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13 minutes ago, Popsbengo said:

Short and sweet:  No and no

Can you prove it pops 😁

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59 minutes ago, No i deer said:

Can you prove it pops 😁

yes I can but thanks for asking 😉

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Bit of carbon in the neck helps the bullet to slip out easily..............if I  clean my cases, I lube the inside of the necks with Lee die lube.

Probably a waste of time, like cleaning the cases in the first place, but it makes me feel good.........😊

Pete

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Cleaning cases? What’s that?😇

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I did say "if"..............😊

Pete

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1 hour ago, Re-Pete said:

Bit of carbon in the neck helps the bullet to slip out easily..............if I  clean my cases, I lube the inside of the necks with Lee die lube.

Probably a waste of time, like cleaning the cases in the first place, but it makes me feel good.........😊

Pete

My understanding is thus:

If you have a bullet jammed in the lands then little more than a slip-fit is probably ok to achieve a good starting pressure for complete combustion.  Otherwise, a "loose" or "slippy" fit is a bad idea as the bullet will move forward under initial combustion and starting pressures will not be high enough for proper and full combustion.  This will lead to low and erratic MV and unburnt powder.

A good consistent neck is what's wanted for accuracy.  Polishing (and lub!) seems the wrong way to go to me.

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I think consistency is the name of the game...........I've heard of american shooters who use a very loose neck, load long, and let the lands seat the bullet.

I plan to try that in the not too distant. It should eliminate variations in neck tension. It'll also need a bit of load dev............

Pete

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Some use dry lube in the neck for neck tension mandrels and seat the bullet on this dry lube that's still in the neck.

I won't mention any names but I know someone who does this who recently chronied some ammo and had an ES of 0 fps and I seen the chrony reading

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7 hours ago, No i deer said:

Some use dry lube in the neck for neck tension mandrels and seat the bullet on this dry lube that's still in the neck.

I won't mention any names but I know someone who does this who recently chronied some ammo and had an ES of 0 fps and I seen the chrony reading

That’s exactly what I do. I shoot for fun, a plinky plonker as Bradders used to say. But I enjoy shooting accurately and that method works for me.

I get consistent neck tension, low sd and spread numbers on my home loads when I use my chrony.

Works for me.

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8 hours ago, No i deer said:

Some use dry lube in the neck for neck tension mandrels and seat the bullet on this dry lube that's still in the neck.

I won't mention any names but I know someone who does this who recently chronied some ammo and had an ES of 0 fps and I seen the chrony reading

I’ve been using dry lube and a neck mandrel for years, although I doubt if there’s any lube left after the mandrel has been in and out of the neck.

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I too use a dry lube for the inside of the necks now I US clean. A little swipe of a cotton bud dipped in HbN (which I use for bullet coating) works well.

Here’s a article on Accurate Shooter about this very issue:

http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2013/05/ultrasonic-cleaning-case-neck-friction-and-bullet-seating/

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Interesting,  but I'm unconvinced.  U/S cleaning is followed by sizing is it not?  The article completely skips over that.

The pictures in the article are pre-sizing through a die I assume.  Sizing operations require lubed necks.  I'd like to see similar pictures after sizing using a button or a collet mandrel.  Very hard steel (or TiN) button or mandrel burnishing the brass under great compressive force.  As Brillo describes, I have also used a neck mandrel with dry lube - this is doing a similar burnishing as the sizing operation above.

Surely spinning a brush in the brass will create annular scratches of a greater depth than the U/S surface erosion.  If it's done before sizing it'll be subject to the same burnishing as I describe so no better than U/S I expect.

I can't see there being any problem with a little dry lube on assembly of the bullet as long as neck tension (or bullet jam) is sufficient to achieve efficient starting conditions for combustion.  I just don't think it's necessary and it's also possibly counter-productive in some circumstances.

Getting back to the original post - Real world results are what counts.  Try some experiments and see

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10 hours ago, No i deer said:

Some use dry lube in the neck for neck tension mandrels and seat the bullet on this dry lube that's still in the neck.

I won't mention any names but I know someone who does this who recently chronied some ammo and had an ES of 0 fps and I seen the chrony reading

does this person jam into the lands or jump?

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I've not inspected my brass with a magnifying glass but visually it looks clean/polished,it's not a real rigid brush and the bristles soon flatten down.i will post a photo of my current bronze brush and have a close look at the necks and report back. 

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