Jump to content
UKV - The Place for Precision Rifle Enthusiasts
Sign in to follow this  
Novice1

Hog Saddle Technique

Recommended Posts

Can anyone using a hog saddle give me some pointers on the technique they use while shooting with it? 

I've always been brought up with not resting a gun on a hard surface as it can affect consistency and accuracy, so the idea of placing a rifle in a clamp is a little alien. 

However  given that they have a following amongst long range shooters and in the military, I'm guessing they work ok. 

Is it the case that you just let the rifle recoil back on the tripod with minimal contact from yourself, or do you have to load the tripod in some way, sort of like some do when shooting off a bipod? 

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Novice1 said:

Can anyone using a hog saddle give me some pointers on the technique they use while shooting with it? 

I've always been brought up with not resting a gun on a hard surface as it can affect consistency and accuracy, so the idea of placing a rifle in a clamp is a little alien. 

However  given that they have a following amongst long range shooters and in the military, I'm guessing they work ok. 

Is it the case that you just let the rifle recoil back on the tripod with minimal contact from yourself, or do you have to load the tripod in some way, sort of like some do when shooting off a bipod? 

Cheers

You can do either and it largely depends on the shot but more importantly the quality of the tripod and it’s ability to manage the weight of the firearm. Free recoil is increasingly being employed but it requires total confidence in your equipment and most importantly in your ability to use the trigger without subjecting the rifle to any movement whatsoever. Those doing this in competition are often using trigger weights at or under 1lb and with 6.5 and increasingly 6mm rifles that weigh 20lbs . If that’s not you, then being more physical with the tripod is the way forward. Try to remain square behind the rifle, apply the proper fundamentals and don’t fight the recoil / don’t load the tripod too aggressively and try to keep your legs locked - bend at the waist forward not at the knees. Tripod height for standing should be roughly at the bottom of your chest.

Finding a comfortable spot for your non-shooting hand is often the challenge. 

Finally, dry fire...a lot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy