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25 minutes ago, No i deer said:

So it was you Richy who incorrectly fitted your V3 for Rob at f range at Sennybridge to blow it into dust 🤣😁

Nah, mines still in one piece, not guilty :)

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Mystery solved! My club has a Labradar and I have now check my .308 against it with the ammo I had been testing with my Chrony and it seems mine was telling the truth.

The Labradar is clearly a much better piece of kit and far easier to set up, but it proved that my Chrony is accurate enough for load development, providing one takes the time to set it up properly. 

I am not well heeled enough to spend big bucks on a chronograph, so am happy with what I'v got. I did see a fellow trying to use a magneto chronograph in our 50m tunnel and give up in the end as he couldn't get any useful data from it; maybe it didn't like the dark?

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I have the magneto 3 and I've never had a problem it's designed to run in any light so being in a tunnel would make no difference to the performance.

ive now just bought the lab radar and first impressions are positive my only comment is you do have to read the manual and it pays to look at some sensible YouTube vids on set up bing  especially careful to select bullet wait.My reason behind the lab radar switch is I've got a lot of load development to do and I always think there's a possibility that the magneto may well effect point of impact.Im just waiting for the weather to change to something sensible so I don't have wind  mirage  or now rain to test in.

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I use a magnetospeed, and tested my fairly ancient chrony against it - firing loads with magnetospeed attached over the chrony initially at 3m. My idea was to see if they were consistent, as I intended to measure velocity dropped at 100m if they were.

I found velocities at the muzzle were 2-300 fps different, but did appear to be consistent. However when placed at 100, the chrony reckoned my 168gn .308 loads had accelerated to around 4000fps ! I have therefore retired the chrony, and now put my faith only in the magnetospeed. As it works by magnets, it is not dependent on light quality.

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On 8/11/2018 at 7:07 AM, Bushdog said:

I use a magnetospeed, and tested my fairly ancient chrony against it - firing loads with magnetospeed attached over the chrony initially at 3m. My idea was to see if they were consistent, as I intended to measure velocity dropped at 100m if they were.

I found velocities at the muzzle were 2-300 fps different, but did appear to be consistent. However when placed at 100, the chrony reckoned my 168gn .308 loads had accelerated to around 4000fps ! I have therefore retired the chrony, and now put my faith only in the magnetospeed. As it works by magnets, it is not dependent on light quality.

 That was most likely a lighting problem with the Chrony. I have made an opaque cover for the crony as a light  defuser and in doing so, eliminated some of the crazy high velocities I would get under certain lighting conditions. (like 3100 fps from  22WMR!) Just a thought.~Andrew

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I chronied 1 shot over my F1 chrono  and it put me within 1/2 moa that my bal cal predicted on the correct weather condition entered at 1000yds.more than happy with my chrono.

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Andrew - yes - you could well be right, I was shooting in woodland with dappled light - unfortunately, that's my usual/preferred test range. In fairness, I have used the Chrony there many times in the past without such wildly erratic results. What did you use for the cover - something like a sheet of translucent stiff polythene?

Cheers.

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On 8/10/2018 at 2:18 PM, Ralpharama said:

I am not well heeled enough to spend big bucks on a chronograph, so am happy with what I'v got. I did see a fellow trying to use a magneto chronograph in our 50m tunnel and give up in the end as he couldn't get any useful data from it; maybe it didn't like the dark?

Magnetos are quite sensitive to how close they are to the bullet on exiting the muzzle. Nobody wants to shoot it but you have to set it up quite close to reliably register shots. Its a one time fiddle as once you know the proper set up you just use the same bits and you are good to go.

I had 2 Chorny's. Far too fiddly, never entirely sure the results were right and I shot them both. Had I not bought a magneto I would have used a bullet with a Litz bc, measured drop at say 400 and fiddled with JBM to derive the mv.  I have to verify/tune anyway, so not sure it would be much of an imposition. I can reload a lot of ammo for £300. Its handy though.

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Can someone put more flesh on the bones of how the UK labradar is different to the US version??

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Radar output is more strictly controlled here, so you don't fry peoples eyeballs and have babies with two heads and 7 fingers

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From their website...

Due to foreign government regulations units sold outside of the United States, Canada and Australia and NZ will be set to the low power setting.  The accuracy of Labradar remains the same, but the ability to track the projectile will be reduced by approximately 30%. Currently all units are being sold in the US and Canada. Export sales will begin sometime in 2016.

So, take 30% off the following tracking distances.....

In general LabRadar will typically measure the velocity of a 7.62 mm projectile from muzzle up to 100 yards. After extensive testing of a variety of calibers you can expect to obtain velocities at these distances when in the Standard Power Mode. Low Power setting will have about 30% less tracking*.
.177 Pellet – 30 yards;
.177 BB – 30 yards;
22 LR – 60 yards;
223 – 60 yards;
270 – 70 yards;
308 – 80 to 100 yards;
9mm – 130 yards;
40 S&W – 130 yards;
45 ACP – 130 yards;
500 S&W – 130 yards;
12 gauge Slug – 90 yards;
Paint Ball – 50 yards;
Arrows – 50 yards;
* Since every bullet has a different profile your results may vary. In general, the larger the base (excluding the boat tail) the great the distance the projectile can be acquired.

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