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Hello

I have been using a Lyman electric scale followed by an accurate/repeatable jeweller scale and trickled to measure powder

I think I may have be missing a trick - I wait 45-60 seconds for the electric powder throw and then trickle to real accuracy

Surely I would be better off in this case - precision powder measuring for relevant ammo, to get a decent, lever based single throw,  powder measure and then use the scale to speed things up / get rhythm rather than waiting on the electric lyman version

What does everyone use here for their more pedantically manufactured precision ammo?

Not an experienced weights and measures person so any tips and tricks much appreciated

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I use a harrel powder measure. Although the lee powder measure is highly regarded for accuracy I like the roller bearings and finish of the harrel. 

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Harrell’s powder measure to  -0.5 grain less, then a good olde RCBS 10-10 coupled to a Targetmaster electronic trickler to do the last bit consistently while I prepare the case for filling.

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I use lee powder scoops then rcbs 10-10 with targetmaster trickler. 

The thing I didnt like about drum type powder measures is when using powders with big kernels you can hear the powder crunching inthe drum when turning the handle. Surely this can have a detrimental effect on the powders proposed burntime due to it being cut?

The result will probably be minute but im probably a bit too ocd anyway.  

Just another mental variable to eliminate for me. 

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I use a tuned  RCBS powder thrower to get near,  then on my tuned RCBS 505 scales, which gets me near. A small bit from the trickler if needed. I always have a small amount of powder on a white piece of card. Then add a kernel/or half at a time to get me my exact charge. MY scales are tuned, including a pointed indicator and a sticky pointer indicator on the scale body, then get them lined up point to point to be exact. All is made large enough to see clearly using my mini camera, which is fixed to the scale body with a usb to my laptop. So half a kernel can make me under or over. It really is that accurate. 

Just to add 1066 didn't tune my scales, But gave me some great instructions on how to do it.   I understand he's too busy with projects now (I presume) but i couldn't have done it without his advice and guidance. Top Bloke!!

 

Edited by chaz
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3 hours ago, 6.5shooter said:

I use lee powder scoops then rcbs 10-10 with targetmaster trickler. 

The thing I didnt like about drum type powder measures is when using powders with big kernels you can hear the powder crunching inthe drum when turning the handle. Surely this can have a detrimental effect on the powders proposed burntime due to it being cut?

The result will probably be minute but im probably a bit too ocd anyway.  

Just another mental variable to eliminate for me. 

I think the main problem with kernel cutting, and you feel this with some powders on many types of throwers, is that the "crunch" shakes the thrower and you end up with a heavy charge.  The Lee thrower, although a bargain basement measure, has a flexible wiper that helps stop this happening.

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3 minutes ago, 1066 said:

:blush: Thank you Chaz :)

No need for the red face Alan, your knowledge is great, and you really know you know stuff, and are happy to help people. When you get chance in your busy schedule. Cheers!  :)

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thanks all - very helpful

I have a leed powder measure in the drawer so may go back to that with a trickled and scales

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Use a half decent powder dispenser and trickle onto a beam or good set of scales. Quick, and consistent.

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I have a BR3 match grade measure here which I've tried with some extruded powder.  As posted earlier, the trouble with this, and most match grade throwers is that they don't seem to work well with extruded powders.  Try throwing accurate loads of something like RS62 and you'll soon see why.  On shorter extruded powders like N133 or even N140, it throws consistently good measures and is quicker for loading even than me using my Lyman Gen 6, as all I do is throw to -0.5 (again, as mentioned earlier) and I "trickle" using a lee scoop to knock the last few kernels in to make the load up.  Takes 20 secs max, mostly less.

The Gen 6 is a great bit of kit and I recommend them, especially for load development where it is faster than adjusting and throwing using even a Harrell, as the adjustment and testing time is removed.

For all the fancy throwers I've owned or used, the Lee Perfect Powder Measure is as good as anything for extruded powders.  I regret buying the BR3 now, although for ball or flake powders, it will throw to within 0.1gr every time and it is beautifully engineered. 

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Varm

great - thanks

The lyman gen 6 is fine as you say but I have a Lee perfect powder measure and I'm sure it will save me time if used with a trickler

I still need the trickler for the lyman and it is a pain to clean

I use RS62 as well in my creedmoor and the grains are long - pretty sure a precision bit of kit like the BR3 would munch them up

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Try adding a slip of paper inside the Gen 6 insert plug.  Whilst the plug negates the need for the straw trick for most extruded powders (and I get +/- 0.1gr most times with it), adding a thin circle of paper to the plug further improves reliability and accuracy when using the thicker extruded powders which tend to clump in all of these auto dispensers.  The downside is that a 25 second charge becomes a 30 second charge but I'll take that over the faff of trickling up or picking kernels out.   It works well for me and is reliable.  Don't use a cut piece of drinking straw inside the reducer plug as it will reduce too much and extend trickling time significantly.  A thin slip of HP Everyday paper works perfectly as it's thinner than most drinking straws.

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The targetmaster trickler a good beam scale and a RCBS powder measure are hard to beat for accuracy and simple to set up and use.

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The OP already has a Lyman 6 though.  I went from an RCBS 10/10 and trickler to a Gen 6 and don't regret it for an instant.  That's progress for you. Many BR shooters now use the RCBS Chargemaster too.  Which works best can be debated infinitum but each have their merits and the type of powder to be measured tends to have similar measurement quirks across the different methods (ie you can still get clumping when trickling RS62 just as throwers can throw heavy when you try cutting the sticks).

 

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It's the last price too...ridiculous!  (I do manufacture some fairly sophisticated kit and know what this stuff costs to make).

No mention of accuracy.

I loaded up a batch of 223 ammo last week using N133. Almost every throw on the BR3 was within 0.1gr (ie good enough by ANY measure).  What is the argument to spend $500 (ie three times as much) to get ????????

 

 

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I have a BR-3 that I would give you if you wanted it. Any powder measure can throw accurate charges of fine grained powder but the litmus test is coarse powders. For these I have found the BR3 Precision Match to be anything but. I have relegated it to the fine Accurate No7 powder for my 45ACP.  It does well with that.... but so did my Lee Dipper set.

As to the Jones Measures. People who own them know that they can talk to someone on the other side of the world and say that their charge of powder "X" is "....Y clicks  on the Jones." and both can be assured that the charges will be the same, LOT to LOT variations notwithstanding. They are hand built and are generally sold as soon as they are completed. There must be a reason.~Andrew

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Yes, I agree with you there.  I only use mine for fine grain powders, and small extruded powders like N133 which it throws very well.

I still maintain that $500 on a powder thrower is a lot of money but bench rest guys may consider that worth it for the speed and consistency.  The rest of us mere mortals probably wouldn't entertain it, especially since items like the lyman Gen 6 appeared which brought affordability to accurate and consistent powder measurement.  Mine has no problems with long coarse grained powders either which is a relief.

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It is a lot of coinage, yes. But in the greater scheme of things, not so much. My annealer was $500.  Dollar for dollar, I seem to get more use from the Jones than the annealer. I bought a mid level Vortex scope the other day and it was $600. That Redding had a MSRP of $267 when I bought it.  All this stuff is expensive -shooters just choose where to spend heavily and where not to. I use the $500 Jones but Lee dies. Go figure! ~Andrew

 

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