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Hi, I reload all my own ammunition(except 22LR and 12G) for 4 rifle calibres and 2 shotgun calibres. A friend wants me to load him some 223 ammunition. Should I put this on his certificate as a shop would do? Should I say nowt? Should I refuse as it may be illegal? He is buying the components by the way. Another alternative would be to let him use my kit I suppose, but he is a bit dippy, and I would have to supervise him at all times.

M

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If you're transferring ammo to him, home loads or factory, you should be signing it onto his ticket.

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As above. I assume you have a 223 on ticket, otherwise wouldn't be an offence to make up the ammunition?

 

Best wishes,

 

David.

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That's right. If you don't have .223 on your certificate, as soon as you make up a round, you're falling foul of the law.

if you do have .223 on your certificate, as does your friend, you can make the rounds up for him but you'll need to 'sign it over' to him from your certificate to his.

personally, unless your mate is really not up to the task, show him how to reload - make an afternoon of it. Bit of instruction, give him a shopping list of reloading gear, and encourage him to roll his own! 👌

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As above, the only way this might be considered legal is if you allow him to use your reloading kit and you supervise him making up his own ammunition on his own property. Technically, you are not taking possession of the ammunition if he keeps ammo that he has loaded using your reloading kit;  at least that's how I read it unless it is being done on your premises in which case you could be on a sticky wicket and the advice would be not to. 

As the others have said, you reloading for him at your place means that you would have to sign it over to his ticket and you would need .223 on your ticket to be able to do that.  If you suspect that reloading is not for him, perhaps the safest and kindest thing to do is to say so.  Not everyone makes a safe driver even though they pass their test, and some people just shouldn't be let near reloading kit for their own sake and that of those around them. 

If he would take care and be willing to learn (has the aptitude) then encouraging and taking time to help him might be a good thing, but then again, it might not if you really think that he is not up to it.  Difficult call. Personally, I'd probably handle it by you inviting him to witness you reloading for your own cals and see how he gets on helping you.  That'd soon tell you if he was able to take enough care.

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Thanks for all the advice. We both have 223 tickets.

 On reading my ticket it is plain that I need to sign them on to his ticket - perhaps I should have read it first!!

Ho hum

M 😳

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I can't see anything wrong with reloading ammo for someone else, but an over-officious FEO or bobby might interpret s.2(1) of the Firearms Act 1920 more loosely than us:

" 2-(l) A person shall not manufacture, sell, repair, test or prove, or expose for sale, or have in his possession for sale, repair, test or proof, firearms or ammunition by way of trade or business unless he is registered as a firearms dealer. "

You'll doubtless say, "It's not my trade or business". It might, however, be enough to get suspicions raised or fingers pointed...

maximus otter

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Section 3 (2) of the current legislation here https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1968/27

Basically says it is an offence to sell or transfer ammunition unless the person buying or receiving the ammunition has an FAC with that calibre listed on it and the quantity they buy/receive does not result in them holding more than the maximum quantity listed on their FAC.

Similarly, the person manufacturing the ammunition also must have an FAC with the relevant calibre listed and the quantity manufactured must not result in them holding more than the maximum quantity listed on their FAC.

So, on Bob's FAC it says he can hold a maximum of 200 rounds of 223.

On Fred's FAC it says he can  hold a maximum of 200 rounds of 223.

Bob reloads, but Fred doesn't

Bob has 100 rounds of 223 in stock and makes another 50 rounds which he is going to give to Fred.

Fred also has 100 rounds of 223 in stock, so receiving the 50 rounds from Bob is no problem, as long as Bob writes the 50 rounds onto Fred's certificate.

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

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