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Afternoon all,  

                       I’ve always kept an informal data book with my rifles (round count, load details). but looking to maybe keep a more detailed affair. Impact data books in the US have caught my eye.

 My question is who here bothers to keep a data book for their rifle and what kind do you use? What information do you keep? Where do you get fresh pages?

 And ultimately, what do you do with the information you collect?

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Hi I keep a data log book. For what ammo I shoot, I record all comps in the book. Range condition on the day. I think I got my book from rifle optics ! 

Keep my load data scope data and Range cards within the book.

When vermin shooting I even scetch a view we’re I am shooting, just to keep myself occupied 

cheers nick 

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Thanks for the reply Nick. And when you’ve collected all this information from the range, how do you actually make use of it?

 How would you go about updating your dope cards when you find trends?

 Or do you just flick trough to a page where previous conditions match those on the day and use that dope?

have you ever spotted a trend that you wouldn’t have spotted without monitoring your rifle over time?

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sadly with wind direction affecting aerodynamic jump and all you data being useless if a powder batch is different i find a basic log of seat depth and accuracy nodes useful but ballistic data always needs updating. i would take one as a back up but use an app whenever poss.

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Hi Long gun, I keep the records of each comp to see if there are any similar data to various comps i shoot, it’s for just a rough idea, the ballistic data is again just to get you on the target or paper target . I shoot at Diggle and I don’t think there a repeat of a comp being the same ! I also look back over the years to see how my shooting. There never a formula to say yep if I use the following MOA I will get this result ! I have plotted each comp and I do sometimes miss something so the recording does help for the next comp . I even write odd notes to remind me of that particular comp.

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Not unless you are a military or police sniper. I think these books are based on these type of persons.

if you don’t want to buy a data log book make your own up! Buy a suitable hard back A3 note book, you can print of your Range ballistics data cards and stick into your book, record all your rifle and scope data and each shooting adventure or trip to the Range enter into book.

i made my very first log book still have it, my wife bought me a data log book for my birthday . Even log my reloading data in the book .

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14 minutes ago, Long Gun said:

Nice.thanks man. Sounds like these data books aren’t the awesome resource the Internet makes them out to be?

They are if you use them properly

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I use the Impact Data Book. It’s very good and I’m pretty disciplined in recording all sorts of data. I also use OneNote on my iPhone/iPad and have built it out to include not just my range needs but also reloading, torque specs, zero sets, round count etc but it comes into its own for brass management and load data. 

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Everyone has there own Little niche on keeping data .

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I’ve just started using a storm tactical data book. It seems to have everything...

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I have a small note pad for load data and then I made an a4 sheet up that I keep in my cabinet with round count for my rifle. 

 

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I keep a cleaning page by the cabin 

ie 223 wipe out 12-11-2017 no shots fired 

243 24 shots not cleaned spot on 12-11-2017

then I keep a note book of elevation for factory and home loads for some  Calibers 

on my stalking /varminting rifles I keep a note on the scope cover of  elevations 

I will now start a more detailed book for target shooting this  has inspired me.

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I have a storm data book, use this for vermin shooting and scetch of areas I am shooting. 

My wife has bought another storm data book which I use for a Range Work.

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On 25/11/2017 at 5:50 PM, triggersqueezer said:

sadly with wind direction affecting aerodynamic jump and all you data being useless if a powder batch is different i find a basic log of seat depth and accuracy nodes useful but ballistic data always needs updating. i would take one as a back up but use an app whenever poss.

I agree with this. I have a log of reloading data - handwritten. I also have a separate Word doc that deals with me trying to get my mind around the ballistics apps that I use and the mistakes I've made.

Regards

JCS

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Just seen this thread and if you use the data book in the right way then you start to see the difference that conditions and terrain have on shots . You can learn more from a miss than a hit  !

I have used a 'rite in the rain' A5 for some years and it works well not to mention it fits the A5 Filofax Inserts .

 

OSOK

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Couple of replies saying useful if used correctly, can people explain how they are using them, what they record and how they are referenced?  Might be helpful to people who don't usually use them

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2 hours ago, Akeld said:

Couple of replies saying useful if used correctly, can people explain how they are using them, what they record and how they are referenced?  Might be helpful to people who don't usually use them

One mans data book isn't always another mans data book.

For instance, some people say they use them for sketching terrain, keeping load data, shot count/barrel life and so on.

I tend to think of them as being calibre/ammo specific, a reference guide if you like.

I personally have no use for sketching or making that kind of range card. I shoot on KD ranges at known targets/dimensions, so something which references that would be best for me.

Something relating to the ammo i'm using with drop and windage charts, target dimensions and aiming marks, a reticle reference maybe and a way of recording scores pertaining to the known matches shot, so comparisons can be made to past and future scores and performances.

A target shooting data/score book will have plot sheets and boxes for noting wind speed and direction, light, temp etc, wind call (real and actual) and some way of recording round count.

 

Of course it can get too big and out of hand, but you can make/build your own with some creativity, because the exact one for you probably doesn't exist

 

But the most important part of having and using a data book is getting into the habit of keeping and using one

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I agree with the above , Mine is a way logging and then trying to understand when shots don't go the way your expecting . I don't see any point in logging something that went to plan through conditions being as you saw them and as the ballistic program said .

What effect does a clean barrel have at a given range then Cold but fouled and then Mod on then off at the same range . Does it then pro-rata at different distances , Is there a formular that is reliable ....... It's endless but useful to know .

Understand your reticles ...... how does 30 moa of holdover compare to 30 moa of dial in different scopes ...... log the difference .

The only use i wouldn't use it for is logging your drops at given distances in the field as these will change for all the usual reasons . Much better to use the ballistic program based upon the conditions on that day rather than old data .

Understanding why we miss makes us better shooters .

OSOK

 

 

 

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I was taught some years ago how to keep a proper data book and range card used to sketch terrain for an area of interest, key points, ranges, dead ground, compass direction, elevations, prevailing winds, location of things like roads etc etc.  It had things like drop data, and other allowances marked on separate pages .  I see no use for such card data for recreational shooting unless to map a large area of land for something like LR vermin control where identifying features and ranges helps for acquiring shots more rapidly if one is out without a rangefinder, and the distances to key points is already by virtue of the range card work, already known.  You can seldom though get enough data at longer ranges for any great precision to cover everything you may need in such cases, so although useful, just carrying a rangefinder and anemometer and using a ballistic app to get on target first shot is more useful.

However, I still keep a data book for reloading and calibration data for my app.  I also keep a record of rifle data;  Load development data for each bullet/cal/powder, and keep key cartridge data in case field measurements are needed in the event of any issues.  I also record ES/SD for each new batch of ammo (usually when renewing powder or primers etc).  It is also useful to keep data on bullet tolerances between batches.  Some bullets vary a lot between base to ogive and if loading 10 thou off and have loaded one perhaps not checked from cartridge head to ogive, then you could be in for a nasty surprise, so this data is useful when load developing, even if just checking consistency of difference bullet models. 

Range data is limited to recording weather conditions, and DOPE for the range/bullet/load being shot so that I have a record of how such conditions might affect elevation/drift.  I also frequently record MV for each batch of ammo and for weather conditions that vary by 5 degrees or more so that I can refine powder sensitivity data between batches.

Probably overkill, but it does enable you to look back and learn from each outing and each load development.  I still see no real use for a military type range card unless you are in the military and need it for terrain and target acquisition planning. However, different folks have different outlooks and needs and it is always interesting to learn what others do.

 

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