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new tikka or sako

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My variation has been approved going to get a 223 for daylight varminting would like to know which wold be best to purchase a tikka or sako,and what would the best barrel twist rate to get .tikka 3x laminate is 1-14 or 1-8 the sako hunter stainless is 1-8 0r 1-12 any suggestions will great

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As for twist rate,I think the 1:8 is very popular and will get a lot of votes as it gives you the ability to shoot the heavier bullets(better BC) as well as 50/53gr,to enable you to shoot further and buck the wind a little better. 1:8 is just a little more versatile.

As for Tikka v Sako,there's been a lot written on this subject. I've owned 3 Tikkas and all were excellent quality and good shooters,I've also owned Sakos,a 75 and an 85 and prefer the 75. I would seriously consider buying a Tikka action and getting it rebarreled,cheaper than a new Sako and if you're handloading,you know you'll be squeezing the best out of your rifle.

It's probably where you'll end up in the end anyway.....

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The last time I was at the S.H.O.T. show in Las Vegas I was told by Sako/Tikka that both brandings used the same barrel blanks so as far as accuracy is concerned, one will pretty much be as good as another. I have 5 Tikkas, two of which are 223's in 1-8" and 1-10" twists. I understand the 1-10" twist is somewhat scarce on your side of the pond but I can tell you that it handles bullets from 35 to 60 grains beautifully. I shoot 50 grain to 70 grain in he 1-8" with the same tack-driving results. Skip the custom route. Buy a T-3 Lite and some excellent glass and get shooting.~Andrew

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As Woodlander,and Andrew-there is not much between the two makes,in the past or now in ter,s of performance with similar specifications. If you can,try several-you might just have ergonomic preferences-or cosmetic-the older models were probably slightly better made/finished,before to many bean counters came in....an older Sako will be about the same as a donor as a Tikka...if you prefer the older models-eg the 75 to the 85,as many do,or the earlier Sakos to the 75-either routewill rebarrel for the same costs,and a bit less than a top new model....performance either way is likely to be an individual rifle thing,but a premium make rebarrel will have a slight edge-for an expert reloader/shooter...but we are talking .1/.2 moa differnces only...on average.Get the model/make that shoots what you want to shoot in distances/bullets and which feels right.You can rebarrel an older one to whatever spec you wish,and still stay about par with a new model.Price won't be the issue-fit and feel (some subjective) might be.I'm 3 and 3,so far (including a PPC which Tikka never offered, and an old A1 222 -pure joy and .25,and 1/3 price of the new models.Just wood and good steel.As Andrew says,don't be mean with the scope-but that does not mean mega£ either; something like a (used) 5-25 Leupold Varmint eg for around £700,or so will realise the rifle's precision and your accuracy.

 

gbal

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.. I would seriously consider buying a Tikka action and getting it rebarreled,cheaper than a new Sako ..

 

Why would you rebarrel a Tikka when they use ---identical--- barrels to the Sako?

As far as factory barrels go, you can do a heap worse than Tikka/Sako.

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T3 just offers more. More options to pimp. For example 10 shot AI type mags. 3 position firing pin safety. Larger selection of aftermarket stocks, even bedded stocks.

edi

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Why would you rebarrel a Tikka when they use ---identical--- barrels to the Sako?

As far as factory barrels go, you can do a heap worse than Tikka/Sako.

I think he means buying a shot out tikka and rebarreling .thats what I did and it does work out cheaper than buying a new sako,did in my case anyhow

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It's a personal choice as there won't be a knat's fart in performance between them. The Sakos used to be markedly nicer finished/screwed together when considering the older model 75, but these days, I think that the T3x or a discounted T3 is a complete no-brainer. They're popular for good reason.

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Is it the same deal with the T3X 223s as it was when I was buying a 204 - the UK only has 20" barrels? do 20s give up much in 223 over the 24s?

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Am i missing something here?? The OP hasn't mentioned a re-barrel. Just whether to buy a Tikka or Sako, and what twist rate to go for.

If that's the case, I've had a few Tikka T3's, and they've been bang on out of the box. Can't comment on shooting a Sako, but i have handled both in shops. Just a bit more glam on the Sako's as far as i can see. As for twist rates - 1 in 12, or 1 in 14 will only limit your choice of bullet weight. A 1 in 8 is the best bar far. My Tikka T3 1 in 8 shoots well from 35 to 75 grain bullets. I personally waited until a 1 in 8 came along as they're just so much more versatile with regard to bullets.

Chaz.

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T3 just offers more. More options to pimp. For example 10 shot AI type mags. 3 position firing pin safety. Larger selection of aftermarket stocks, even bedded stocks.

edi

 

yes but you have to. plastic mags...

 

By the time you have added in new bottom metal, after market stock why bother starting with a Tikka ? You are not going to get the money back, better starting with something that has a price point and may hold some of the value.

 

get the heavy barrel and 1:8 defo. why would you limit the options

 

75 Varmint with a 24" tube would be my suggestion

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yes but you have to. plastic mags...

 

By the time you have added in new bottom metal, after market stock why bother starting with a Tikka ? You are not going to get the money back, better starting with something that has a price point and may hold some of the value.

 

get the heavy barrel and 1:8 defo. why would you limit the options

 

75 Varmint with a 24" tube would be my suggestion

 

One answer could be that when you walk into a shop and see a 75/85 sitting next to an AI stocked T3 ..( if/when they're produced )...which would hold their value more?..and, which would you prefer to buy?

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yes but you have to. plastic mags...

 

By the time you have added in new bottom metal, after market stock why bother starting with a Tikka ? You are not going to get the money back, better starting with something that has a price point and may hold some of the value.

 

get the heavy barrel and 1:8 defo. why would you limit the options

 

75 Varmint with a 24" tube would be my suggestion

I have 3 mags, all plastic, never an issue with one. And yes i do shoot plenty of rounds a year.

Not being an ar5e, just saying....

Chaz.

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IF/WHEN...dream on---why not add Sako /AI stock....even then,you are mixing two variables....that may never come to pass-nor be ideal-right now,not much in it-and I'd go for Sako (it has a decent stock from stock!)...75 before 85.Same barrel,allegedly,better everything else-perhaps.Rifles can be individuals.

gbal

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IF/WHEN...dream on---why not add Sako /AI stock....even then,you are mixing two variables....that may never come to pass-nor be ideal-right now,not much in it-and I'd go for Sako (it has a decent stock from stock!)...75 before 85.Same barrel,allegedly,better everything else-perhaps.Rifles can be individuals.

gbal

 

The American market shouts louder I believe, than any other country re: shooting? I would also think Beretta's Tikka sales far outnumber their Sako sales worldwide? Money talks in any language. Therefore, keep "dreaming the dream" ...and wait for when AI produce the configuration to compliment an already fine barrel/action, instead of purchasing one of the many 'pretenders' on that ole' black-rifle chassis bandwagon...Let's be honest, all those other 'pretenders' will be racing to inlet their stocks for the many other manufactures/models out there when AI decide to splash the cash and produce the one stock a lot of Tikka owners are waiting for. .(incidentally, I'm not)

 

I'd think shooters would wait and save that little extra cash for an AI stock than any other make, if or when it becomes available - (so yup, that dream again ;)

Sadly, it's called vanity but. that's the way it is...(remember when you was in school and you wanted the best looking daps? - same thing :lol: )

 

Worldwide popularity and cost of Tikka shouts louder than any Sako (however 'nicely put together the Sako is).. to AI to develop a lucrative product for a worldwide audience ....it's called business and in all likelihood that stock will be produced for the Tikka rather than the Sako, unless of course Beretta hop in to the sack with AI and make a deal, whereby all Beretta produced rifles could be fitted with AI stocks.

 

ATB

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My variation has been approved going to get a 223 for daylight varminting would like to know which wold be best to purchase a tikka or sako,and what would the best barrel twist rate to get .tikka 3x laminate is 1-14 or 1-8 the sako hunter stainless is 1-8 0r 1-12 any suggestions will great

 

OK back on track as the thread's drifting along the lines of a marketing debate exercise:

 

1/8 offers more versatility and will shoot everything from 50gr to 77gr bullets. 1/12 or 1/14 will limit bullet choice more and are better suited to the lighter bullets.

 

Buy new if you can or very good, low count round used from someone you trust.

 

Buy whatever comes into budget that you like after handling, and ANY of the ones on your list will make good serviceable and very accurate rifles.

 

If you need to carry the rifle over any distance and value a lighter weight one, avoid heavy barrels and stocks. If you can get the 24 inch version, you'll have 80-100fps potential more over the 20 inch variants. Many favour the shorter ones as they fit into a truck easier and come up shorter with a mod fitted. I favour the longer barrelled ones personally. The T3x has certain advantages over the T3 but doesn't shoot any better. The SAKO is slightly better put together but they're all pretty good. As mentioned, buy a T3 and you have more after market options if that's your thing. If you want to keep it standard an intend to keep it a long time, perhaps the SAKO is the one to look for and used prices hold up slightly better.

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Varm,agreed and sensible advice relevant to the OP question- (buy a Sako or Tikka 223,now?)

Snakeman,Tikka is excellent value,cheaper than a Sako.That perhaps impacts on sales.The 'black rifle chassis' seems off the point-stretching it,Tikka have just introduced a PRS style rifle (like Ruger,Bergara) but there is no Sako,so no comparison.

IF the issue was, T/S were bringing out an AI stock,in a year,some would understandably wait.Some would not,nor be tempted.AI does not define dreams (and just the stock,even less so,popular though they might be for other reasons (not just wannabe/vanity).

I have/had 4 Sakos,2 Tikkas,5 Rems,none have needed retro fit 'goodies'-admitedly,I'd quite like one for one Rem,as its factory stock is notoriousy modest-jbut shoots 5 inches at 1000y,so isn't a train crash.An AICS clone stock costs more than any of these rifles cost me; a quality scope would be a far higher priority. Choices,of course.

 

Not the issue-one might wait a long time (as one would already have done-Tikka/Sako have never had such option to date.

 

The OP is understandably keen to fill his slot fairly soon...waiting for something he may/not actually be intersted in is,without any hint of it ever coming,is perhaps unlikely to be helpful. :-)

 

gbal

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Nothing yet has convinced me of the Sako 75 route. Too expensive too little to offer. The T3 is streets ahead.

If you want a serious Varminting rifle in 223 it should have a ten shot mag. A few weeks back we counted 6 fox with one swing of the lamp. Over ten fox in

an evening is nothing unusual here. We have converted many T3's to 10 round mag systems. The Sako owners we had to send away.

The real advantage of a T3 is that a properly bedded stock will take any T3 meaning if you own a T3 say in 223, another in 308 or a CTR one can swop stocks back and forth as the season progresses. With a scope and stock swop one can change a range gun to a hill rifle etc.

 

Mag options alone for 223-308 size. Just look at the weight of the original T3 plastic set up difficult to beat 73grams.

 

aZHwVT.jpg

 

My Varmint Rig, light, accurate and ten shot.

 

FnwfYc.jpg

 

Or possibilities with the CTR (stock will swop out with the other AICS floor plate and 223 rifle)

 

Q3kW87.jpg

 

edi

 

ps.

Not to forget a proper 3 position firing pin safety available for a T3. Streets ahead of a standard Sako.

 

ImgEJM.jpg

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I recently sold my sako 85 and bought a new tikka t3x ctr and couldn't be happier

DON'T!! I'm turning green with envy!! :(

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