Jump to content
UKV - The Place for Precision Rifle Enthusiasts
brown dog

The 'Sane' end of Prepping

Recommended Posts

I'll admit that I sit at the 'prepper' end of the bushcraft spectrum (as, I suspect do many who claim 'bushcraft' in order to avoid the tainted title of 'prepper') - oil strikes, cyber attacks, terrorist-based disruption, anything that could significantly disrupt - for up to a a few months- the taught 'just enough, just in time' transport-dependent stock holding models that modern supermarkets use.

 

So, no zombie apocalypse stuff, just ideas on riding out a major supply disruption of up to a few months - until normality resumes.

 

Wondering whether to open up the Bushcraft forum to cover this sort of interest: "Bushcraft and the sane part of Prepping" or some such.

 

Grateful for feedback on the idea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds good.

I think we should re-learn the old skills forgotten. Like how to harvest what grows in the hedgerows etc and about what we can grow at home but,just as importantly how to use all the seasons and store everything.

 

Bryan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watching the Bear Grylls TV thing yesterday and marvelling at the ineptidude of the hapless idiot who could not light the fire after 2.5 (!!!) hours of trying, I think you came up with a very good idea BD... Prepping is not a matter of how much sugar shoud we haul, it is also about what skills we should possess...I'm all for it!

 

Best wishes

 

Finman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good idea, I enjoy foraging, Jam/jelly making, pickling and preserving. would love to hear new ideas and recipes from other people. I understand some peoples reluctance to "coming out of the closet" because of the "Zombie/SHTF" mentality but after all, these skills were only lost over the last couple of decades. I bet most peoples mother's and granny's were preserving for winter to some degree as a matter of course.

Good recipe for Rose hip syrup anyone????? mine never seems to last very long.

Adrian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BD I'm with you on this no 'end of days' stuff, just up to a couple of months due to weather, transport issues, strikes etc.

 

Sounds like a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be interested in that. Living in the sticks as I'd imagine most people here also are, I'm occasionally cut off from something if only for a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well,why not-it might be fun.We do have the nice back up of canned foods and deep freeze (my back up one cost less than an upmarket utility tool,and has considerable advantages-eg milk and bread).

On the other hand,I quite like gathering berries etc-for fun,so far-and a diet of trout and rabbit is endurable for several days. One girl friend made fun of me for having 30 packets of fire lighters,until her half packet runout one Sunday am.

Some of these were not available to previous generations-hence 'Keiller' jars and so on. I am not too keen on returning to hunter gatherer wholesale though-sounds like 'Mad Max' -or would be if everyone was at it-all those loaded Blaser rifle in the dark-or even to becoming an ape...one of the species' best survival tools is it's brain,and 'be prepared' is an option,for those with foresight.

Still,it will be interesting to find out alternatives...I did wonder if Tesco might stop rural deliveries.One neighbour used to do 'survival' weekends,by driving his Range Rover to wilder areas-I thought that was a bit of a compromise,and he should walk,for the fuller,richer experience.....and he had Kendal Mint Cake in the glove box....

 

gbal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BD I'm with you on this no 'end of days' stuff, just up to a couple of months due to weather, transport issues, strikes etc.

 

Sounds like a good idea.

 

I'd be interested in that. Living in the sticks as I'd imagine most people here also are, I'm occasionally cut off from something if only for a day.

 

Exactly what you've both said.

 

 

Spitballing topic ideas:

 

  • Selecting and buying suitable storable food.
  • Supplementing stored food.
  • Producing drinkable water if the main stops.

 

What else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knowing what needs attention when the power goes off.

Maybe a buyers guide for small generators or battery backup devices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Car kit - summer and winter.

 

Storage items for family of ?? number of persons for a given period of time.

 

How to store food for given period.

 

Water storage and how much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once a long time ago , I lit a fire to cook me lunch on , it was pouring with rain , had been for a while , all the wood was wet , & I had only a few matches .

But I had some skill , and it is as simple as get all your wood sorted , small as your match up to about pencil size , also I placed it under a big tree , to give a little rain protection .

Lit it with one match , and it took 1 hour to get it to the cooking size ,

 

I have seen some absolute muppets try to light fires , and all start with great big bits of wood , and a match , never going to work .

 

RE : Prepping for civil supply interuption of food fuel etc , in modern times just buy FerFALs book " Surviving the economic collapse " by Fernando Aguirre , a very cheap book , with a metric TON of practical advice , hard won by actual experience , he covers most things in this book .

 

Later Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spitballing topic ideas:

 

  • Selecting and buying suitable storable food.
  • Supplementing stored food.
  • Producing drinkable water if the main stops.

 

What else?

 

  • communications - multi waveband radio to 'keep up' with what's going on. Possibly some hand-helds, depending were you live
  • Lighting - assume no power so general illumination, torches etc.
  • Basic medicines and first aid supplies
  • A plan, sounds silly, but if it's all been discussed at the dinner table 'if' anything happens and your life is uncomfortable then you and your family are not adding 'what's next' to the mix.
  • how do deal with basics e.g. 'taking a dump', with no running water (if you've a well then no good simply digging a hole in your back yard!).

Makes you start thinking?

 

T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sounds very good. It is all about low-scale issues - power cut; food or fuel shortages; communication. Definitely up for this if you get it started BD. As geek said, it is planning for short-term difficulties, rather than long-term SHTF situations.

 

Went on a survival course down south (Trueways Survival) with my wife, which was a wedding present. The second day involved a competition to see who could light a fire the fastest with a flint striker. My wife came first out of 30 blokes...with me a scant 3 seconds afterwards!!! All the others were minutes after this. People are not prepared for jacks%&t.

 

Also, it would be nice to have something this which is not USA-centric.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting that I'm seeing a few usernames and writing styles that I recognise from a prepping forum....

 

It's a good idea BD. Personally, I had my eyes well and truly opened after doing some essay writing on SCLM, as I researched the uk threat matrix as regards to our critical national infrastructure.

 

Water, food and transport are all good topics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd also be interested in this...

 

I've never been that deep into it, but I do try to keep my self prepared.

 

For me it all started quite a few winters back... I always try to keep a stocked pantry with foods that will last, and some of the same in the car inc a basic 'survival kit'

 

Even before this I've gone as far as keeping a couple of 20L Jerry cans topped up with fuel. (But that all started when I realised that it wasn't going to be under a quid for much longer!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even before this I've gone as far as keeping a couple of 20L Jerry cans topped up with fuel. (But that all started when I realised that it wasn't going to be under a quid for much longer!)

Just a note to anyone storing diesel, because of EU biofuel directives, diesel stored in metal containers has a limited lifespan.

We had to change the farm diesel tank from steel to plastic because of this, it was blocking tractor filters up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a fantastic topic with access to discuss many different life experiences and training, and something to try enjoy, not endure.

Modern tools, materials and fuels make the processes that bit easier and comfortable compared to "ye older days". There is much to learn from 1000 years ago that is still applicable now for day to day living.

 

Think of how much self sustainable living now means in your day to day living just now....

 

Hydroponics any one? High yield, small space (pesticides? None) powered by solar etc). LED lighting throughout your house.... (60 watts including the garage total for me), veg oil for the van possibility. Smoking, salting and pickling food for longevity. How insulated is you house...any draughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will0, that is very good to know... Luckily back then I stored only petrol and now what I do store now is used within two weeks and replenished. (like rotating stock in a shop!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a whole load of Prepper vids on Youtube. In fact some of you have probably seen a few of them as they used to air on TV here a few years ago

 

Here's one for example

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in peoples opinion of how much food or other items to store for a given scenario (i.e. for one - three months), based on a typical family i.e. two adults + two children or three adults (I.e. parents + teenager).

 

Such as:

 

Food - need to consider shelf life etc. (I have about 10 24 hour ration packs - but these do have a shelf life). Long life food seems quite expensive.

Water - I have a couple of reservoirs not too far away and a stream a few minutes away / water purification

Toiletries - soap, shower gel, loo roll, baby wipes,

Electrical - radio (wind-up), batteries (shelf life!), torches (battery and wind up)

Miscellaneous - bin bags, rubber gloves, bleach, buckets, glow sticks,

Medicine (shelf life!)

etc.

 

Also any links to items would be a worthwhile addition, to assist others in collating their own stash / kit.

 

I just thought a few list to help others to start collecting or even reviewing their own stores would be worthwhile.

 

Anyone willing to share pictures of their stores, again to help others - is it on shelves, in boxes, etc.?

 

Thank you and any replies / guidance is much appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the subject of storing diesel.............some plastics used for 25 litre containers will break down if in contact with diesel for any length of time, so only use those specified for the purpose.

 

Also:

    • It is illegal in the UK to store more than 30 litres of petrol and/or diesel on your property at any one time.
    • That maximum of 30 litres must be split into 4 containers. You are allowed 2 metal containers with a maximum capacity of 10 litres each, and 2 plastic containers with a maximum capacity of 5 litres each.

Can anyone verify this last point? It's from http://www.octagoninsurance.com/guide/tips/storing-petrol-diesel-safely/

 

Re-Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I understand it there are no specific legal requirements on how to store diesel or the quantity allowed either in workplaces or domestic premises. I have 60 litres in the garage in 20L metal containers and I rotate them every 6 months or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a note to anyone storing diesel, because of EU biofuel directives, diesel stored in metal containers has a limited lifespan.

We had to change the farm diesel tank from steel to plastic because of this, it was blocking tractor filters up

is that due to ,diesel bug ,which lives in plastic tanks as well but there is additives to stop it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in peoples opinion of how much food or other items to store for a given scenario (i.e. for one - three months), based on a typical family i.e. two adults + two children or three adults (I.e. parents + teenager).

 

Such as:

 

Food - need to consider shelf life etc. (I have about 10 24 hour ration packs - but these do have a shelf life). Long life food seems quite expensive.

Water - I have a couple of reservoirs not too far away and a stream a few minutes away / water purification

Toiletries - soap, shower gel, loo roll, baby wipes,

Electrical - radio (wind-up), batteries (shelf life!), torches (battery and wind up)

Miscellaneous - bin bags, rubber gloves, bleach, buckets, glow sticks,

Medicine (shelf life!)

etc.

 

Also any links to items would be a worthwhile addition, to assist others in collating their own stash / kit.

 

I just thought a few list to help others to start collecting or even reviewing their own stores would be worthwhile.

 

Anyone willing to share pictures of their stores, again to help others - is it on shelves, in boxes, etc.?

 

Thank you and any replies / guidance is much appreciated.

 

Without wanting to get silly, you state a stream as presumably, an open source of drinking water.

Is this somewhat presumptuous on your behalf given radiation or other contamination possibilities?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy