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liongeorge

Dry firing

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I would like to do some dry firing of my Sako 75 to try and refine my trigger control as suggested by various authorities on accurate shooting technique.

 

Is a dummy cartridge necessary to prevent damage to the firing pin etc?

 

cheers George

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I am not gunsmith or an expert but I have been informed that no you will not damage the firing pin without a dummy cartridge.

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Why not use a spent case?

 

just dont mix em up!

 

Mark

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Obviously they're built to different tolerances but military weapons get dry fired a lot with no apparent damage to firing pins.

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couple of years back we were in SA after a day's culling. Our host was using his 'old faithful', a Sako 579 in .243. Whilst cleaning it, his son managed to disassemble the bolt and the pin came out. We all huddled around it, trying to put the bolt together again. I noticed that the pin looked as if it were new. I therefore asked the owner if he ever replaced it (I knew that the rifle was on its 4th barrel). He said 'No, never'. I asked if he knows how many times it's been dry fired. 'Millions would be my guess...!'. Now, this was on a rifle that was bought in 1974 (not sure but I think so), has killed more things than the bubonic plague and does not know what 'oil' is...

So, if this example is anything to go by, dry fire away and worry not :)

 

best wishes,

 

Finman

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They all look perfect til they fall in half Finman :P

 

Nah, I have no qualms in dry-firing unless it's a rimfire

 

Chris-NZ

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You don't want the firing pin smashing into the leading edge of the chamber. There is the possibility it will eventually pein a proud edge which will score the bullet/case as its chambered.

 

Chris-NZ

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No need.

If you must leave the bolt in the rifle, just hold the trigger as you close the bolt slowly. There's no danger of any damage to the barrel face if you do this and the main spring isn't under compression.

 

Chris-NZ

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you may not damage the pin or break anything, but 1st time you do , you wish you haven't ;)

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dry firing is good practise, close your eyes and squeeze that trigger, get that muscle memory going plus you'll be able to feel any creep or if it feels gritty........

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To my mind snap caps are just bad practice the risk of damage is insignificant compared to setting up bad habbits.

 

Dave

 

Dave, I've been trying hard to to try and understand your statement, but I can't decide exactly what the problem is with snap caps?

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To my mind snap caps are just bad practice the risk of damage is insignificant compared to setting up bad habbits.

 

Dave

Dave, I'm a noob on this forum but not to shooting. I'm intrigued as to what bad habits snap caps would potentially induce.

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Dave, I'm a noob on this forum but not to shooting. I'm intrigued as to what bad habits snap caps would potentially induce.

 

When you come back from the pub in a beer induced drunken stupor and think it's a great idea to get the gun out to show your equally blethered mates, you might inadvertently put a live round in there rather than a snap cap

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When you come back from the pub in a beer induced drunken stupor and think it's a great idea to get the gun out to show your equally blethered mates, you might inadvertently put a live round in there rather than a snap cap

If at any stage in your life you think it is reasonable to open your cabinet drunk then you should not hold an FAC. If you get drunk enough not to realise what you are doing then you should not hold an FAC. Dry firing is fine. However it will not substitute range time or try partnered training in a range using "ball and blind" this will help clear up any snatching or flinching issues.

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Working in pairs one man behind the rifle one to the ejection port chamering the round manually and closing the bolt. If done well the firer will be unable to tell wether the chamber is empty or a live round fitted. This is a tool used a lot for pistol training, i have used it to good effect with new bolt action shots learning high calibre weapons. By not knowing the state of the weapon the firer is then forced to ensure his prefiring drills are correct.

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When you come back from the pub in a beer induced drunken stupor and think it's a great idea to get the gun out to show your equally blethered mates, you might inadvertently put a live round in there rather than a snap cap

 

So the bad habit is using snap caps or handling firearms when drinking?

 

If someone is going to keep snap caps and live rounds together they aren't responsible enough to own a firearm. If someone is going to "play" with firearms when pissed then they certainly are not responsible enough to own a firearm.

 

Sorry Bradders but it's not the snap cap that's the problem. I'd have a go at those who leave magazines on their firearms and other such basic safety related matters.

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I guess tone, humour, and perhaps sarcasm doesn't come across all that well over the internet......

 

With regards to snap caps - nothing worries me more than hearing a slide being locked back and something being ejected and landing on the counter by the rack in the range as someone takes an LBP or other .22 out of it's case to rack it at the start of a shoot. 'Don't worry, its just a snap cap'. Don't put daft things in your chamber and you wouldn't have to explain it to concerned punters EVERY SINGLE TIME.

 

The only way a chamber should be when it's not in use is truelly empty, or with a chamber flag in it.

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