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  1. Walter Mitty Foxing.

    I’ve been reading some posts this morning on a facebook foxing page that really made me smile. Some guy claimed to be shooting foxes out to 450yds at night with a10x drone, what really made me smile was the video footage he posted claiming to substantiate it. Assuming his rifle was set up with 100yd or even 200yd zero, his 22-250 rifle with a 50 grain bullet at 3800fps will drop 24-30”. Yet during the video you see him giving the shot no such hold over. I use a Photon 6x50 RT myself with a 1.7 doubler which would give me 11x mag which is very similar to the 10x mag on the drone. I’m aware the optics on a drone is better than the photon but 10x mag is 10x mag. Having viewed the video of the “450yd” Hollywood shot I’d suggest the shot was neared 250yds than 450yds. To make the shot even more ridiculous the fox was clearly running up and down a bank which would alter the drop considerably at that range and we haven’t even started talking about bullet drift due to wind. Why do they do it ? I’ve been shooting foxes under the lamp and more recently with a thermal spotter and NV gear for well over 10 years. I’ve shot them with a .17hmr, .22lr, .222rem, .223rem, .223ai, .22-250rem, .243win and even a 6x47SM. I have come to the conclusion that the .223rem is my ideal foxing rifle because the normal foxing range is 50-150yds with occasional 200-250yd extended shots. Why do people write such nonsense ? I was recently chatting to the guys at Pulsar and the topic of “imaginative shooters” arose during our conversation. Apparently they set up some targets at a game fair at various ranges , they then asked various shooters how far away they thought the targets were. The results were rather interesting, nobody got close to all target ranges but most were 100yd+ out over 350yds. I suspect if the same experiment was carried out at night the results would be worse. Add to the difficulty of accurately ranging a fox at night without a rangefinder the difficulty of shooting at a Fox running around giving only a few seconds to take the shot and then the problem of assessing the wind and then the issues uneven ground or trying to shoot from a wing mirror/bonnet/ Shooting sticks and this shot gets more unlikely. is it just me shooting foxes at 50-250yds or are 450yd shots under the lamp the norm, if so can someone show me how. If it is done I suspect it’s a case of seeing some eyeshine at Xtreme ranges and taking a speculative pot shot.
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