Power outage - a tidy solution... - Heat, Power and Comms - UK Varminting

Jump to content


UKV Topic Header Banner (sys)
Photo

Power outage - a tidy solution...


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 U108294

U108294

    Newbie or Infrequent Poster

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Newbury
  • Interests:Working gun dogs, fly fishing and shooting

Posted 20 April 2015 - 09:20 PM

Only a thought, driven by another thread...



We lost power for five days last Chrismas but got by using a 7-hour petrol gennie and a extension lead. "Getting by" made me think of a more "robust solution"...

My local electrician fitted (1) an external input socket, (2) a feed to the DCU (domestic consumer unit aka fuse board) and (3) a changeover switch. This allows an external gennie to be lugged into the fuse board, isolating the electricity board supply, to feed the essential bits of your home.

I balanced the capacity of the gennie to the "need to have" bits by turning stuff off on the fuse board and then " zoning down" to individual appliances like freezers.

The whole modification cost £250, plus a 3.5KW genie from eBay for £300.

Not cheap but better than no Christmas...

UKV Topic First Post Banner (sys)

#2 kennym

kennym

    Newbie or Infrequent Poster

  • Members
  • 19 posts

Posted 21 April 2015 - 12:29 PM

Do you,

1) have canned food & water stashed under the floorboards

2) a bugout bag

3) a zombie gun

 

lol, sounds like a good idea to be fair.



#3 marty

marty

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 251 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North of Aberdeen
  • Interests:Shooting ,shooting ,more shooting ;))

Posted 21 April 2015 - 03:57 PM

Got my own well , dry freezed food lasts forever , dry herbs and plentiful rabbits wildfowl and deer covers it I think


We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would harm us.
- George Orwell

#4 brown dog

brown dog

    Advanced Member

  • Global Moderator
  • 7,780 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Wilts

Posted 21 April 2015 - 05:39 PM

Only a thought, driven by another thread...



We lost power for five days last Chrismas but got by using a 7-hour petrol gennie and a extension lead. "Getting by" made me think of a more "robust solution"...

My local electrician fitted (1) an external input socket, (2) a feed to the DCU (domestic consumer unit aka fuse board) and (3) a changeover switch. This allows an external gennie to be lugged into the fuse board, isolating the electricity board supply, to feed the essential bits of your home.

I balanced the capacity of the gennie to the "need to have" bits by turning stuff off on the fuse board and then " zoning down" to individual appliances like freezers.

The whole modification cost £250, plus a 3.5KW genie from eBay for £300.

Not cheap but better than no Christmas...

 

Excellent!


"A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition."


#5 Will0

Will0

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 157 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aylesbury, Bucks

Posted 21 April 2015 - 07:51 PM

That's a reminder: we need to run ours up.

The old man got a similar setup sorted years ago, but it's a tractor (PTO) mounted gadget. Big enough to keep the house and the yard going! Although I don't think it'll do the three phase

#6 Mauser3006

Mauser3006

    Advanced Member

  • Global Moderator
  • 147 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aldershot, Hampshire
  • Interests:I reload for .243 and 30-06

Posted 23 April 2015 - 09:49 PM

Only a thought, driven by another thread...



We lost power for five days last Chrismas but got by using a 7-hour petrol gennie and a extension lead. "Getting by" made me think of a more "robust solution"...

My local electrician fitted (1) an external input socket, (2) a feed to the DCU (domestic consumer unit aka fuse board) and (3) a changeover switch. This allows an external gennie to be lugged into the fuse board, isolating the electricity board supply, to feed the essential bits of your home.

I balanced the capacity of the gennie to the "need to have" bits by turning stuff off on the fuse board and then " zoning down" to individual appliances like freezers.

The whole modification cost £250, plus a 3.5KW genie from eBay for £300.

Not cheap but better than no Christmas...

There is really no substitute for "training".  (Or having actually lost your power for 5 days!)  What else did you learn, what did you need, what did you have that worked well?  I have been thinking that the next time my family are away I should flip the electricity off and see how I cope over a weekend.  I bet it would throw up all sorts of issues that were easily solved, but I haven't thought of.  Better to learn before the power goes off for an extended time for real. 


You think that a wall as solid as the earth separates civilization from barbarism. I tell you the division is a thread, a sheet of glass.         John Buchan

#7 DL.

DL.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 293 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:S/W Scotland

Posted 08 June 2015 - 05:20 PM

Only a thought, driven by another thread...



We lost power for five days last Chrismas but got by using a 7-hour petrol gennie and a extension lead. "Getting by" made me think of a more "robust solution"...

My local electrician fitted (1) an external input socket, (2) a feed to the DCU (domestic consumer unit aka fuse board) and (3) a changeover switch. This allows an external gennie to be lugged into the fuse board, isolating the electricity board supply, to feed the essential bits of your home.

I balanced the capacity of the gennie to the "need to have" bits by turning stuff off on the fuse board and then " zoning down" to individual appliances like freezers.

The whole modification cost £250, plus a 3.5KW genie from eBay for £300.

Not cheap but better than no Christmas...

 

Many thanks for this recommendation, I had an electrician do this today.



#8 FGYT

FGYT

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 183 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cranborne Chase Dorset
  • Interests:Outdoors, SCUBA,Shootin, Knife making

Posted 28 June 2015 - 10:03 AM

I do this  for freezers if we go down for more than a day   they are in a Utility which has its own ring main   I have a lead with a plug on both ends so can plug the Genny into any socket in the ring   

I do make sure the main breaker is off and that the Ring main RCD is off this isolates the house from the grid   and the  Ring from the rest of the house   SO i dont waste power on all the stuff plugged in on standby or  let the Solar system power up as they where not sure what the  fairly dirty supply from the Genny would do the to the  Solar power unit (only works if there is main supply )

 

Light the fires   and candles  etc 

 

Father in law used to ave this set up incase of a cut as his wife had to have pumped oxygen  in the  house  so could run the oxygen generator in a powercut 



#9 phillips321

phillips321

    Newbie or Infrequent Poster

  • Members
  • 32 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gloucester

Posted 04 October 2016 - 09:02 AM

I have a lead with a plug on both ends

 

 

You realise just how stupid this is? Just incase you didn't think about the scenario...

 

It's dark, the powers out, the fridge and freezer are defrosting, you fire up the generator and plug one end in, you're in a rush. You can't find the other end of the cable on the floor so start fishing for it...ZAP! Game over!

 

Do yourself a favour and get one of these off flea bay for nice and cheap and it'll do the change over and grid disconnect for you :-)

http://www.ebay.co.u...m//272258690237



#10 cervusman

cervusman

    Newbie or Infrequent Poster

  • Members
  • 12 posts

Posted 17 April 2017 - 05:36 PM

I also an wired up for a generator and I have a buzzer wired up to the grid side that is normal switched off, switched on during power failure so as soon as the power goes back on I'll know.

#11 Chris-NZ

Chris-NZ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 1,643 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hawkes Bay, NZ
  • Interests:Hunting, varminting, target shooting, duck shooting (socially). Sea and trout fishing

Posted 18 April 2017 - 06:57 AM

Some good ideas there guys. We're right in the middle of a new house wire-up so have been thinking about this, and our focus sharpened last week when a cyclone hit the country and we had no power for 18hrs..

 

Our new setup includes 4.8kW of PV panels so it has complicated these considerations.



#12 tackb

tackb

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 1,535 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:newmarket
  • Interests:stalking,longrange shooting , baiting landrover/blaser owners

Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:59 AM

Do you,

1) have canned food & water stashed under the floorboards

2) a bugout bag

3) a zombie gun

 

lol, sounds like a good idea to be fair.

 

a zombie gun ? will one of my normal guns be ok ?

 

are there energy and velocity requirements to be zombie legal and is it different in Scotland?



#13 Tikka4Sika

Tikka4Sika

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • 193 posts

Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:55 PM

 

 

 

are there energy and velocity requirements to be zombie legal and is it different in Scotland?

There are different seasons for male and female zombies in Scotland but its difficult to differentiate as they all wear skirts :)



#14 radd

radd

    Newbie or Infrequent Poster

  • Members
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Radnorshire, Mid Wales

Posted 19 April 2017 - 06:45 PM

 

 

You realise just how stupid this is? Just incase you didn't think about the scenario...

 

It's dark, the powers out, the fridge and freezer are defrosting, you fire up the generator and plug one end in, you're in a rush. You can't find the other end of the cable on the floor so start fishing for it...ZAP! Game over!

 

Do yourself a favour and get one of these off flea bay for nice and cheap and it'll do the change over and grid disconnect for you :-)

http://www.ebay.co.u...m//272258690237

 

 

If you kill yourself, it's your own fault....

If you send 240v back into the grid (out here in the sticks, it goes through the pole transformer that transforms it to 11,000v) and it stings the guys that are busy trying to repair the fault....






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users